Solved

Extracting Active Directory information without login into Domain

Posted on 2011-09-22
5
207 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi,

We are setting up a new network with  Windows Server 2008 and about 10 PCs. They have an existing network which we are migrating over. The existing network has two Widows server 2003 servers, however as they are leased from old IT company, they are not giving us admin access so we can't even see AD.

We have been given a user that has admin rights we are told and we are able to log into application server, but only the actual server, we cannot log into the domain from the server.

What I want to know is information such as their existing security groups that exist.

What is the best things I could do to extra as much information as possible.

Note that they do not have Exchange installed on these servers. They used and will continue to use hosted exchange.
Thanks in advnace
0
Comment
Question by:afflik1923
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 57

Accepted Solution

by:
Mike Kline earned 250 total points
ID: 36581465
You can try tools like adinfo   http://www.cjwdev.co.uk/Software/ADReportingTool/Info.html  or adfind to query the AD with that admin account.  By default a normal user has read access to most of AD.

Thanks

Mike
0
 
LVL 41

Assisted Solution

by:Adam Brown
Adam Brown earned 250 total points
ID: 36581510
If you have a Domain User account, and a local admin account on one of the servers connected to the network, you should be able to install the Windows 2003 Resource Kit http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=17657 to get a view of Active Directory. You would only need read access to AD to get the information you need, which is granted to all users by default, unless they've changed things, you should be able to get what you need to by doing that.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:temores
ID: 36586806
Use DSQUERY (from the 2003 reource kit)

"dsquery group -limit 0" will list all your groups in AD.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:satishpeta
ID: 36591109
Check this tool, even this can be used by a domain account. Also, this gives information about group membership. This is all in one tool:

http://www.systemtools.com/hyena/

0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:afflik1923
ID: 36938302
Thanks for all the info. In the end got the information from the previous administrators but this was all very useful
0

Featured Post

Are your AD admin tools letting you down?

Managing Active Directory can get complicated.  Often, the native tools for managing AD are just not up to the task.  The largest Active Directory installations in the world have relied on one tool to manage their day-to-day administration tasks: Hyena. Start your trial today.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article provides a convenient collection of links to Microsoft provided Security Patches for operating systems that have reached their End of Life support cycle. Included operating systems covered by this article are Windows XP,  Windows Server…
This process allows computer passwords to be managed and secured without using LAPS. This is an improvement on an existing process, enhanced to store password encrypted, instead of clear-text files within SQL
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of transferring the five major, necessary Active Directory Roles, commonly referred to as the FSMO roles to another domain controller. Log onto the new domain controller with a user account t…
There are cases when e.g. an IT administrator wants to have full access and view into selected mailboxes on Exchange server, directly from his own email account in Outlook or Outlook Web Access. This proves useful when for example administrator want…
Suggested Courses

623 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question