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How does ping resolve a hostname but nslookup fails?

Posted on 2011-09-22
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I remote into a clients PC at his office.  I can ping the hostname of a device and it returns an IP.  If I do an NSLOOKUP it fails (contacting the local DNS server).  How is this possible?
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Question by:GDavis193
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 36582567
The hostname is in your local hosts file but not in DNS.

wmp
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by:emilgas
ID: 36582606
is it on the local LAN, because local LAN doesn't really need DNS, it all happens on layer 2 (well some layer 3 too), but once you get out of your local LAN you need some sort of a DNS service. So NSLOOKUP specifically looks up the DNS records and finds the ip. Ping uses arp which is Layer 2. And if your local LAN doesn't have it then default gateway gets involved and so on.

So which is it?
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by:GDavis193
ID: 36582607
The host name is NOT in the local HOSTS file.
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by:americanpie3
ID: 36582618
try ping -a IP address and see if it returns the host name.

If it is different, go into the DNS server and look in the reverse lookup which hold PTR records.
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by:GDavis193
ID: 36582623
@emilgas

So how does this work?  I ping a hostname, it goes out on the wire and the switch broadcasts "which port / IP has the hostname XXXX".  The device then replies back with its IP and hostname confirmation?  

So no DNS query at all?

Yes, this all occures on the local LAN.

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by:emilgas
ID: 36582712
you are right, any time there is a ping your local NIC sends a broadcast arp request, the switch sees it and says who has this mac address by sending the request (as a broadcast) to all the switchports, and finally the NIC that has that IP says hey, that mac address is mine and here is the ip. and responds to the original NIC that send out the request. No DNS involved.

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by:GDavis193
ID: 36582894
Ok but how did it resolve the hostname is my question?  I understand the IP to MAC (layer 2 resolution) but not hostname to IP resolution.  
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 36582975
Does "nslookup hostname" or "nslookup ipaddress" fail?

If only looking up the IP fails this IP is missing in the reverse lookup tables but not in the direct lookup tables.
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emilgas earned 400 total points
ID: 36583037
Oh... LOL
Hostname resolves because your windows has a built-in Mini DNS that looks at local LAN for computers around it. It would only work on the local LAN and this is a windows feature that's built-in.
I'm not 100% what it's called if it has a specific name for it. But I know it has to do with the Local Service called "DNS Client" that's running on PC.
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by:woolmilkporc
woolmilkporc earned 100 total points
ID: 36583106
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by:GDavis193
ID: 36583135
Ah cool.. LLMNR seems like the answer.  I wonder why DNS never updated though....

Im about to split up the points but if anyone can chime in on why maybe  LLMNR worked but the DNS server didn't know about this device...

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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 36583146
Why the DNS server didn't know?

Because no one updated it ... ?!?

wmp
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by:GDavis193
ID: 36583157
Could be?  I have no idea.  Points for helping with the correct answer... docked some points for being a smart ass :)
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