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Windows 2008 Folder Rights

Posted on 2011-09-22
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I am embarrassed to ask this question, but it has been a very long time since I have done this.

I have a folder on a server, I want the root drive to be set up so everyone has access to read all the folders, in this case about 100 folders.   Each person will have 1 folder that they will have write access to, everyone else will have read access to.

On the root folder - What do I set the Share Permissions to?  What do I set the Security Permissions to?
On the sub folder - what do I set the Security Permissions to to give the owner of that full rights over that folder, but all other users read rights only?

I am getting tripped up somehow, I am missing something - on the sharing tab, if I give the user more than read rights, no matter what I do on the subfolders everyone can write/delete.


Thanks

C
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Question by:czerafa
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ZephyrTC earned 1000 total points
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First off, don't be embarrassed.

Rather than just spell it out, I thought it best to show you this:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb727040.aspx

     
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by:AJMeyer66
AJMeyer66 earned 1000 total points
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In this case I would generally give full privileges for the share.
I generally always set the shares as full control for domain users and then control access via NTFS.

Give everyone read permission to the root of the drive and then only give the necessary permissions to the sub folders.
Review inheritance to see how this works and go by the principal of least privilege, i.e. don't give them anymore privileges than what they need to do the job.
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