Linux RHES command / file to find out WWN of a HBA FC card


Think " lspci -vv " doesn't give the WWN of HBA FC card.

I have one faulty pc & one working one, need to replace the faulty
unit & pre-configure the new HBA card's WWN on the SAN

Q1:
What's the command to find out WWN in RHES 4.6?  Is there
a file that stores it?

Q2:
How do I determine if it's the left HBA card (viewed from the rear
of the server) or the right HBA card for each of the WWN listed?

sunhuxAsked:
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Duncan MeyersConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The WWN is in /proc/scsi/qla2xxx. It's 210000e08b80da51 (or 21:00:00:e0:8b:80:da:51) for adapter 0 and 210000e08b804928 (or 21:00:00:e0:8b:80:49:28) for adapter 1
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:

This is what I got below, but I don't know how to tell from the info below
what is my WWN  (for the left & right HBA cards as viewed from the rear):

[root@ qla2xxx]# pwd
/proc/scsi/qla2xxx

[root@qla2xxx]# grep -i port 0 | more
Port down retry = 030
scsi-qla0-adapter-port=210000e08b80da51;
FC Port Information:
scsi-qla0-port-0=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c49:020c00:81;
scsi-qla0-port-1=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4d:020d00:82;
scsi-qla0-port-2=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4b:020e00:83;
scsi-qla0-port-3=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4f:020f00:84;
scsi-qla0-port-4=500110a00092c655:500110a00092c656:021400:86;
scsi-qla0-port-5=500110a00092c658:500110a00092c659:021500:87;

[root@qla2xxx]# grep -i port 1
Port down retry = 030
scsi-qla1-adapter-port=210000e08b804928;
FC Port Information:
scsi-qla1-port-0=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c48:010c00:81;
scsi-qla1-port-1=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4c:010d00:82;
scsi-qla1-port-2=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4a:010e00:83;
scsi-qla1-port-3=50001fe150077c40:50001fe150077c4e:010f00:84;
scsi-qla1-port-4=500110a00092c64f:500110a00092c650:011400:86;
scsi-qla1-port-5=500110a00092c652:500110a00092c653:011500:87;
scsi-qla1-port-6=100000e002032875:100000e002232875:010100:88;
scsi-qla1-port-7=100000e002032871:100000e002232871:010000:89;
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Duncan MeyersConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The simplest way to tell which is which is to plug the cards into your Fibre Channel SAN switch, then take a look at the Name Server in the FC switch - you'll have one WWN appear in one switch or port and the other WWN will appear on the other switch or port. You can easily trace it back from there. The WWN is usually on a small sticker on the FC HBA as well, but that requires that you power down the server.
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:

Hi Meyersd,

How did you derive 210000e08b80da51  for adapter 0 and 210000e08b804928
for adapter 1 from the outputs I posted.  I don't see those hexadecimal strings
in the outputs I posted at all (unless I'm due to change my glasses)
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Duncan MeyersConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It's the second line of the grep output:
scsi-qla0-adapter-port=210000e08b80da51
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Duncan MeyersCommented:
Time for those new specs then...   :-)
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Duncan MeyersCommented:
The WWN strings starting with 5000... Are the storage array. An HP EVA is it?
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:

Meyersd, you're right, it's a HP EVA8000 storage array.  Wow you can tell from it.
So there's vendor specific for those strings?

Which website tells us based on the number string, it's from which brand/vendor's storage ?
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Duncan MeyersCommented:
It's administered by the IEEE - like Ethernet MAC addresses, there's a manufcturer-specific prefix. I haven't looked for years but the manufacturer-specific prefixes used to be behind a pay wall. They may be free now, or someone may have compiled a list.

I recognize the HP prefix because I've been doing storage stuff for
12 years or so now and I have a good memory for irrelevant rubbish.   :-)
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:
excellent
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Duncan MeyersCommented:
Thanks! Glad I could help.
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