• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 235
  • Last Modified:

In time range again...

We are going to throw a message up during Paypal's planned outage this weekend to prevent customers from getting confused when they can't purchase when Paypal is down. This is the code we are currently using, kindly provided by gurvinder372 in this post http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/Scripting/JavaScript/Q_27320332.html:
  d1 = new Date();
  d1.setDate(24);
  d1.setMonth(8);
  d1.setFullYear(2011);
  d1.setHours(23);
  d1.setMinutes(30);
  
  d2 = new Date();
  d2.setDate(25);
  d2.setMonth(8);
  d2.setFullYear(2011);
  d2.setHours(4);
  d2.setMinutes(0);
  
  currentTime = new Date();
  currentTimeMS = currentTime.getTime();
  if ( d1.getTime() < currentTimeMS && d2.getTime() > currentTimeMS ) {
    alert("<b>Our payment processor has a planned outage between 11:30PM PDT Sep. 24 and 4:00AM PDT Sep. 25, 2011.<br>"+
          "If you receive this message then our provider is offline at this time.</b>");
  }

Open in new window


The problem I neglected to see lies in the fact that the outage is happening between 11:30PM PDT and 4:00AM PDT.

How do I account for the difference between the client's time zone and PDT?
0
Eddie Shipman
Asked:
Eddie Shipman
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
WizardOfOgzCommented:
You want to use UTC when comparing times.

d1 = Date.UTC(2011,8,25,6,30); // Please check that the time was adjusted for UTC properly
d2 = Date.UTC(2011,8,25,11,0);

currentTime = new Date();
  currentTimeMS = currentTime.getTime();
  if ( d1 < currentTimeMS && d2 > currentTimeMS ) {
    alert("<b>Our payment processor has a planned outage between 11:30PM PDT Sep. 24 and 4:00AM PDT Sep. 25, 2011.<br>"+
          "If you receive this message then our provider is offline at this time.</b>");
  }

Open in new window

0
 
Eddie ShipmanAll-around developerAuthor Commented:
6:30 and 11:00 ??
0
 
Eddie ShipmanAll-around developerAuthor Commented:
Sorry, GMT...
0
 
WizardOfOgzCommented:
@EddieShipman Yes, those times were converted from PDT (which is -7 hours) to Universal Time.

Creating a date with your original code uses the client's local time, so it will vary according to the user's timezone setting.
d1 = new Date();
  d1.setDate(24);
  d1.setMonth(8);
  d1.setFullYear(2011);
  d1.setHours(23);
  d1.setMinutes(30);
  // d1 will be different for each timezone!

Open in new window


So instead we create a UTC date to avoid the timezone differences.
d1 = Date.UTC(2011,8,25,6,30); // Same no matter what the client's local timezone is

Open in new window


This all relies on the fact that
9/25/11 6:30am UTC == 9/24/11 11:30pm PDT == 9/25/11 1:30am CDT, etc.
0
 
WizardOfOgzCommented:
Yep, GMT ;-)
0

Featured Post

Never miss a deadline with monday.com

The revolutionary project management tool is here!   Plan visually with a single glance and make sure your projects get done.

  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now