Solved

Expand existing VMware Server 1.0.9 Guest Drive C & D

Posted on 2011-09-23
6
660 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hello everyone,

My host is Server 2003 R2.

My guest VMs are Server 2000 & NT4

My C: & D: drives are running out of space. I have cleared out all temp files and removed any unnecessary programs and relocated the pagefile. In addition I have already added an E: drive.

Without upgrading is it possible to increase a Guest VM Disk under VMware Server 1.0.9 with a special utility or command line program?

- Tom
0
Comment
Question by:mcit0331
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 4
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 120

Accepted Solution

by:
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 500 total points
ID: 36589492
Yes, you use

the C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Workstation\vmware-vdiskmanager -x {diskSize}GB "c:\vm\yourvm.vmdk"

that increases the disk, and then you need to increase the OS partition inside the VM.

Before making any changes to the partition structure of the disk, ensure you have a full backup, not a snapshot.

1. Resize partition with Gparted Live CDROM

i. Download Gparted Live CDROM (http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php).

ii. Upload the cdrom iso to the vSphere ESX/ESXi datastore.

iii. Mount the cdrom or iso on the virtual machine.

iv. Shutdown and restart the virtual machine booting from the cdrom.


v. Select Resize partition.

Here is a Tutorial Walkthorugh of how to resize a partition with a GParted Live CDROM

http://gparted.sourceforge.net/larry/resize/resizing.htm

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/using-gparted-to-resize-your-windows-vista-partition/


2. Using DISKPART.exe

(the system disk cannot be re-sized within the virtual machine, but other disks can be resized, eg. D: E: etc

i. Shutdown the virtual machine.
ii. Remove disks from virtual machine (but do not delete them).
iii. Add the disks to another virtual machine.
iv. Start up virtual machine.
v. Use Diskpart in the OS to extend disks.

see here for details on Diskpart usage

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325590

3.Use VMware Converter Standalone to complete a V2V (virtual to virtual conversion).
there is an option to increase or decrease the size of target disks on the desintation at conversion.

Download VMware vCenter Converter here

http://downloads.vmware.com/d/info/datacenter_downloads/vmware_vcenter_converter_standalone/4_0

VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 4.x Documentation

http://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/converter_pubs.html

VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 4.3 User Guide

http://www.vmware.com/pdf/convsa_43_guide.pdf

For the conversion steps, read fellow Expert Bestway's article.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/VMWare/A_3639-VMware-vConverter-P2V-for-Windows-Servers.html

Best Practice Video Guide here

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1004588

Also the VMware KB here

http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1004071
0
 
LVL 120
ID: 36589495
0
 

Author Comment

by:mcit0331
ID: 36589715
Thank you Hanccoka,

I already have VMware Converter Standalone 4.0.1 build 161434 and never even thought of V2V. In your opinion is this the best method?

In addition, in your opinion which is a better choice for the destination disks:

Pre-Allocated
Not Pre-Allocated
2GB Split Pre-allocated
2GB Split not Pre-Allocated

- Tom

0
Manage your data center from practically anywhere

The KN8164V features HD resolution of 1920 x 1200, FIPS 140-2 with level 1 security standards and virtual media transmissions at twice the speed. Built for reliability, the KN series provides local console and remote over IP access, ensuring 24/7 availability to all servers.

 
LVL 120
ID: 36589759
Pre-Allocated much faster.

To be honest with you I'm a hands on "old timer", and like to use GpartEd LiveCDROM.

But V2V is easier, because you can expand and increase partition, in in one Process, and you have a backup!

once, you've tested your new VM, you can destroy the original.
0
 

Author Comment

by:mcit0331
ID: 36589855
I just ran the V2V and everything is working great.

For me the VMware Standalone Converter is definitely the way to go.

Thank you Hanccocka.

- Tom
0
 
LVL 120
ID: 36589872
Tom

no problems, thanks

Andy
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

When converting a physical machine to a virtual machine using VMware vCenter Converter Standalone or vCenter Converter Enterprise, if an adapter type is not selected during the initial customization the resulting virtual machine may contain an IDE d…
Will try to explain how to use the VMware feature TAGs in the VMs and create Veeam Backup Jobs using TAGs. Since this article is too long, I will create second article for the Veeam tasks.
Teach the user how to delpoy the vCenter Server Appliance and how to configure its network settings Deploy OVF: Open VM console and configure networking:
Teach the user how to install and configure the vCenter Orchestrator virtual appliance Open vSphere Web Client: Deploy vCenter Orchestrator virtual appliance OVA file: Verify vCenter Orchestrator virtual appliance boots successfully: Connect to the …

732 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question