• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 768
  • Last Modified:

Private network routing between two Hyper-V Windows Server 2008 R2 servers

I'll do my best to describe what I am trying to do.  I may try and create a diagram if my description is inadequate.

My goal is to utilize the secondary server NICs and directly connect two Hyper-V servers together to achieve a backend private network between them.  The Hyper-V servers and all their VM's should use the secondary interface for any and all traffic between them.

I have two WS2008R2 servers and each are running Hyper-V.
Both servers have two NICs, a primary and secondary.
The primary NIC (192.168.1.0/24) is enabled and secondary NIC (10.0.0.0/24) is disabled.
The primary NIC provides internet access for the Hyper-V servers and all the VM's.

The configuration above works correctly and completely. The downside is that when VM's on server1 talk o VM's on server2 the traffic must all go through the single interface and the network switch.

THE PROBLEM:

With the secondary NIC configured and attempting to ping via the secondary NIC, all server1 Hyper-V VM's can talk to each other and to server1, but not to server2 or its VM's. And vice-versa.

I have configured binding order so that the secondary interface for all servers and VM's is the top priority.

When a VM on server1 attempts to talk to a VM on server2 there seems to be no traffic.  



0
Dan-Aspitel
Asked:
Dan-Aspitel
  • 6
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Svet PaperovIT ManagerCommented:
The easiest and cleanest way to do that is:
1. Create a dedicated subnet for the network between both servers using the 2nd NIC
2. Clear the checkbox of “Allow management operating system to share this network adapter” of the 1st NIC and use it for all VMs
3. To route between the Hyper-V servers and virtual machines you will need a router: you can use your default gateway router/firewall if you have multiple interfaces on it or another router. If it is not the default gateway, you will have to either manually add the route to the routing table of each VM or use a logon script to publish it.
0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the reply.

>>1. Create a dedicated subnet for the network between both servers using the 2nd NIC

10.0.0.xxx is dedicated to it.

>>2. Clear the checkbox of “Allow management operating system to share this network adapter” of the 1st NIC and use it for all VMs

I do want the host servers to be accessible on the second network though.

>>3. To route between the Hyper-V servers and virtual machines you will need a router: you can use your default gateway router/firewall if you have multiple interfaces on it or another router. If it is not the default gateway, you will have to either manually add the route to the routing table of each VM or use a logon script to publish it.

The NICs are connected directly together without a router or switch. I'm not sure exactly what route I should be adding though.

Would route entries on all VM's be sufficient or should I instead be using the RRAS on each host server to route the second LAN?

0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
Perhaps this is what you proposed?

Would this be a workable solution for the second NIC:

- host server1 and all its VM's would be on 10.0.1.xxx
- all of these would have a route to direct 10.0.2.xxx to server2


- host server2 and all its VM's would be on 10.0.2.xxx
- all of these would have a route to direct 10.0.1.xxx to server1
0
Improve Your Query Performance Tuning

In this FREE six-day email course, you'll learn from Janis Griffin, Database Performance Evangelist. She'll teach 12 steps that you can use to optimize your queries as much as possible and see measurable results in your work. Get started today!

 
Svet PaperovIT ManagerCommented:
The setup I suggested follows the best practices to separate the management traffic (back-end connection between both Hyper-V servers) from the production traffic (of the virtual machines). It is the easiest and cleanest configuration.

In your case I suspect you have routing problems on both servers. Start by looking at ROUTE command on the servers: you could use ROUTE ADD to set a static route if needed. If the management traffic is allowed on the virtual adapters, the servers behave as mulhihomed.
0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
The issue does seem to revolve around routing/forwarding between the two host servers; and the desire to not use a physical router.

If the server1 IP is 10.0.1.1 and the server2 IP is 10.0.2.1 what would each server need a a route?

Would each VM have the corresponding server as their gateway?
0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
Or do I need to have 3 separate private networks?  

(p1) 1 for the server1 VM's
(p2) 1 for the server2 VM's
(p3) 1 which both server1 and server2 belong

Then use RRAS on server1 to route p1 through p3 and
use RRAS on server2 to route p2 through p3

Would that work?
0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
Perhaps what I am trying to do without a physical switch is beyond Windows Server  2008 R2.  I'm reading a bit about HP's virtual switch and Cisco's plan to have a virtual switch for Windows Server 8.

http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2011/09/cisco-bringing-virtual-switch-support-to-hyper-v-in-windows-server-8.ars
0
 
Dan-AspitelAuthor Commented:
Accepting this in order to close this question.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows Powershell® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

  • 6
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now