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Adding RAID support for Vista x64 after installation

I installed Windows Vista x64 on a machine quite some time ago. This machine has a few drives. One of those drives I want to mirror with RAID-1, so I installed an identical drive, switched the machine's BIOS from SATA to RAID, and created the array with these two drives. When booting into Windows, however, it makes it part-way through the Vista loading screen before a VERY brief bluescreen appears (too fast to even read) and the machine automatically reboots. I set the motherboard back to SATA mode and Vista booted fine (but the RAID-1 drives appear as uninitialized in Device Manager).

I'm assuming Vista won't start with the motherboard in RAID mode because no usable RAID drivers are installed? Is there a way I can add RAID support to this system without having to reinstall Vista with the RAID drivers?

I'm aware that I could set up mirroring through Vista with minimal performance impact, but I'd prefer to use the motherboard's RAID controller if at all possible.

EDIT: I probably should mention in case it's helpful... the motherboard is an ASUS M3A78-EM. The RAID information shows up as an AMD Raid option ROM version 3.0.1540.34.
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elorc
Asked:
elorc
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2 Solutions
 
psychogrCommented:
Hardware raid must be enabled and configured prior to os install. You wont be able to convert it later on.
Even with software raid I dont think you could do it because it requires you to convert your disks into "Dynamic partition".

If you want raid array then you need to backup your drive into image then create an array, format your drives and then restore your backup from image.

Good luck
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rindiCommented:
Just try installing the drivers when Vista is running, and after that setup the array. If that doesn't work, first make an image based backup of the system (Vista backup should do for this, but you can also use 3rd party tools). Then boot with Paragon's Adaptive restore utility. You should be able to add drivers using that.

http://www.paragon-software.com/products/business/
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elorcAuthor Commented:
Well it looks like I don't have much choice. I'll give the driver installation a shot but it's looking like I'm probably going to have to just reinstall. If that's the case, I may as well buy a Windows 7 license for this machine and reinstall with that instead.
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rindiCommented:
With paragon's tool you shouldn't need to reinstall as you can add the drivers via the tool.
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