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Outlook 2010 connecting to Exchange 2010

Posted on 2011-09-25
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Can anyone help me.  I'm trying to figure out the steps internally how Outlook 2010 [which is a MAPI client] connects to an Exchange 2010.

Does it go through the CAS first via RPC client Access service, then it re-directs it to the mailbox server.

I cannot find any documentation on this.
Thanks
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Question by:techgenious
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Expert Comment

by:Viral Rathod
ID: 36597293
With Exchange 2010, MAPI and directory access connections has also moved to Client Access Server role. This has been done by introducing a new Client Access Server service known as the RPC Client Access service.

That means that MAPI clients no longer connect directly to a Mailbox server when opening a mailbox. Instead they connect to the RPC Client Access service which then talks to Active directory and Mailbox server. For directory information, Outlook connects to an NSPI endpoint on the Client Access Server, and NSPI then talks to the Active Directory via the Active Directory driver.


http://www.msexchange.org/articles_tutorials/exchange-server-2007/planning-architecture/uncovering-new-rpc-client-access-service-exchange-2010-part1.html
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Author Comment

by:techgenious
ID: 36601029
Here's a question for you and keep in mind my external networking skills are beginner.

If I want to RDP into say my network from home ,  and I want to access my Exchange 2010 server.
 
What is the process of that.  Keep in mind we have a edge server & a hub transport server.

Two Scenarios:
I connect through VPN first Cisco Any connect, then RDP into my desktop.  
Connect via OWA.

What is that process.

Thanks the article really helped.
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Expert Comment

by:ActiveDirectoryman
ID: 36625215

you don't have to connect to via your vpn you could not forward the ports for rdp on your firewall so that when a request comes from the outside it gets forwarded to the internal port.    

yea if you are using vpn you use your vpn client to connect to your internal network and then you can RDP directly to your exchange server.  u don't event have to connect to your desktop since you would already be connected to your internal network.  You could also load exchange management tools on your workstation and manage your server that way once you are connected to your internal network. there are different ways to do it.
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ActiveDirectoryman earned 500 total points
ID: 36625633
you don't have to connect to via your vpn you could forward the ports for rdp on your firewall so that when a request comes from the outside it gets forwarded to the internal port.    

yea if you are using vpn you use your vpn client to connect to your internal network and then you can RDP directly to your exchange server.  u don't event have to connect to your desktop since you would already be connected to your internal network.  You could also load exchange management tools on your workstation and manage your server that way once you are connected to your internal network. there are different ways to do it
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Author Comment

by:techgenious
ID: 36692438
I understand but like what protocols are used, ports etc.   I guess it is more from a networking point of view on how to connect.

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Expert Comment

by:ActiveDirectoryman
ID: 36704868



this question is broad keeping in mind that there are different vpn protocols out there.

lets just say you are using   pptp which stands for (point to point tunneling protocol).  from your vpn client on your home network you will establish a secure connection over port 1723 to your external firewall if that port is open.  a secure tunnel is created between the vpn client and the server. Once you are connected to your internal network you will make a remote desktop connection over port 3389 to your exchange server or whatever machine you would like to connect to.  In essence, you are making a connection then a tunnel is created between you and your network so no one can sniff through the packets going across the internet.  

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Author Comment

by:techgenious
ID: 36712404
thx this helps alot you are the best
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