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Create an MDE file I cannot enter a password field

Posted on 2011-09-26
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi.
I have an created an access Database in Access 2007 and then converted to a 2003 database. This is because some of the users only have 2003.

My first form is a login form where the user will enter their user ID and a Password – if a valid password is entered (checked against a password in a table) then this will display the next form appropriate to this user. The password field is setup with the Input mask set to password on the properties sheet.

The issue I have is that when I convert to an MDE file I cannot enter a password – This field is not enabled. This works perfectly when I am in the .MDB file.
thanks
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Question by:MECR123
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4 Comments
 
LVL 85
ID: 36598223
Converting to a .mde file should have no effect on your ability to use that field, so I assume something else is going on.

How are you converting to .mde? Do you have another instance of Access 2003 on the same machine? If so, and if you did this by just switching from 2007 to 2003, then I'd encourage you to reboot the machine before opening the 2003 instance and creating the .mde file.


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by:MECR123
ID: 36598268

thanks - Yea a strange one indeed

I am making the MDE file by going to database tools and Make MDE.

I have also tried creating a ACCDE file from within Access 2007 and I have the same issue.  Again works file in a .MDB format.

I only have access 2007 on my PC





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John_Arifin earned 125 total points
ID: 36598332
You have to convert to MDE in the Access 2003, because it is not backward compatible.
Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/Aa167800, under the Protecting Your Code with MDE Files topic
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LVL 85

Assisted Solution

by:Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 125 total points
ID: 36598394
Also see this article:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/926712

A snippet from there reads:

"Because of the changes that Access 2007 makes to a database when the database is saved an .mde file, .mde files cannot be converted to a file format from an earlier version of Microsoft Access."

In other words, you could make a .mde file and open THAT file with 2007 or 2010, but not with earlier versions. At best you'll have troubles with the database. At worst, you won't be able to open it with 2003 or earlier. As JohnArifin said: Get a copy of 2003 and use that to build your .mde file. That is the ONLY reliable way to do this.

Finally: The "Make MDE" button should never have been on the 2007 ribbon, IMO. It is confusing, and has no real bearing on the process being executed.
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