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Error Messages like Network Connection: 8ms ping to home server

Posted on 2011-09-27
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi ,

We are facing a very weird problems. When users are shutting down or starting up machines.

Error Messages like Network Connection: 8ms ping to home server

For more information attached the screenshots.
IMAG0021 is when a user gets this at start-up (rarely happens)
IMAG0022 is when shutting down the computer (happens regularly, but not always.

All user profiles are roaming profiles. Most of the users mapped the network drives.

Please help me out to get this sort out!!!!

 when a user gets this at start-upIMAG0022.jpg
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Question by:valuelabs97
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4 Comments
 
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by:netjgrnaut
ID: 36710655
Is your logon/network access actually slow - or slower than normal?

These messages are displayed automatically based on calculations of link speed against thresholds set in Group Policy.  They can be tuned or disabled completely.

Here's some (slightly dated) info on how slow link detection works on older versions of Windows (you appear to be running XP, if I'm seeing those screen shots correctly).

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/227260

Hope that helps!
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Author Comment

by:valuelabs97
ID: 36718795
Network access is working fine. All are Cisco based medium and high end switches.

Question 1: As in screen shots it shows 8ms/6ms ping latency to home server. Can anybody tell me what server it is trying to ping and where to see the logs for more details.

Question 2: Also 8ms / 6ms are normal latency.. but still it is showing as a medium network

Thanks
Santhosh
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netjgrnaut earned 2000 total points
ID: 36815618
From http://support.microsoft.com/kb/227260

[M]ethod of determining whether a client computer is gaining access to a domain controller over a slow link to apply Group Policy or download a roaming user profile. This takes the form of a sequence of TCP/IP ping requests to the destination server.

So, to answer Question 1 - the result is based *either* on the ping to the DC or the server where the roaming profiles are stored.  Are these different servers in your environment, or the same?  I'd recommend pinging both from the command line to see what's really going on.

For more detailed logging, you'll need to look at Userenv.log for the info outlined in my link above.  You'll probably need to enable environment debug logging first.

The link I posted originally - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/227260 - has all the nitty gritty on "why is my link detected as slow" (or in your case, medium).  More importantly, it will direct you to where you can adjust the metrics.

There's a couple of ways to look at this issue, without getting into a debate on whether or not 6-8ms ping response is "normal latency" on a 10/100/1000 network of "medium and high end" Cisco switches (I don't know that I think it is "normal," but that's probably because we're working with ill-defined terms.)

1

If your network performance is (subjectively) acceptable, and the user experience is "normal" despite these warning messages, then your goal should be to adjust the link speed detection metrics to make the errors go away by customizing the settings to suit *your* network performance.  Or just set them to 0 (to disable slow link detection) if you're not using this "feature" in your design.

2

If you expect better network performance based on your servers, network interface cards, and switching infrastructure, then your goal should be identifying the server "causing" the bottleneck and troubleshoot the end-to-end path between client and server (as well as server performance in general).
So how you get this "sorted out" depends very much on what you see your problem as: the link speed warnings in XP, or the actual underlying network performance.

If you want to sort out the former (link speed warnings in XP), check out the MS links I've posted here.

Good luck!
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Author Comment

by:valuelabs97
ID: 36901446
Hi Netjgrnaut,

Thanks a lot :)

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