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physical to virtual server conversion

Posted on 2011-09-29
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Last Modified: 2013-11-06
i have a Windows Server 2003
it contains 2 disks. both are connected via a SCSI controller.
i attempted to do a P2V conversion using SCVMM and CA ARCserve D2D using the copy recovery point wizard and renaming the .d2d file to .vhd.
using both approaches i get a blue screen when i boot the VM.
i later found an article that said that the blue screen is as a result of the physical server using SCSI disks and Hyper-V can only boot off IDE disks and does not support SCSI disks.
how can i convert this server to a Hyper-V Virtual Server?
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Question by:netrescue
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 1000 total points
ID: 36817631
try Disk2vhd

Disk2vhd is a utility that creates VHD (Virtual Hard Disk - Microsoft's Virtual Machine disk format) versions of physical disks for use in Microsoft Virtual PC or Microsoft Hyper-V virtual machines (VMs). The difference between Disk2vhd and other physical-to-virtual tools is that you can run Disk2vhd on a system that’s online. Disk2vhd uses Windows' Volume Snapshot capability, introduced in Windows XP, to create consistent point-in-time snapshots of the volumes you want to include in a conversion. You can even have Disk2vhd create the VHDs on local volumes, even ones being converted (though performance is better when the VHD is on a disk different than ones being converted).

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415
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Author Comment

by:netrescue
ID: 36817684
hi hanccocka,
thanks for the response.
i will definitely try using this utility. i see it does not mention support for converting SCSI disks into IDE disks (if this is even a valid process).
will it convert the SCSI disks into a format that is supported to be attached to a VM as IDE and avoid the blue screens due to the fact that the source disk was SCSI but i am attaching it as an IDE disk?
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LVL 124

Assisted Solution

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 1000 total points
ID: 36817706
it will read the disk as is, and create a VHD.
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Author Comment

by:netrescue
ID: 36817768
i understand what the tool does.
i have used 2 different tools thus far that does the same thing. create a VHD out of the physical disks on the server.
however, because those physical disks were SCSI disks, when i attached the VHD files as IDE disks on the VM and attempted to boot, i got blue screens that reference driver and disk errors.
later read an MS article that stated that physical servers using SCSI disks cannot be directly converted to VHD files. there is apparantly a script that can convert the SCSI disk to IDE but i am not sure how to use it.
see the important note in the following article:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd296684(WS.10).aspx
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Author Comment

by:netrescue
ID: 36997510
hello,
the script did not work. after a long period of trying and troubleshooting and even asking a local microsoft techie to help out.
i have found a tool that can do what i want.
CA ARCserve D2D. it performs disk based backups of the server. it creates a file that represents each volume of the server. these files can then be converted by another tool called CA Central Virtual Standby into either VMware or Hyper-V format. downloaded a trial and it did it all for me.
took 20 mins to get it all set up. the longest thing was actually performing the backup and waiting on the file to get converted. maybe another tool to add to your list of tools in your arsenal for P2V!
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Author Closing Comment

by:netrescue
ID: 36997515
the tools suggested would not form part of the complete solution. although it would convert or create a VHD file, it would not be bootable or in a format suitable for booting.
the tool highlighted (CA ARCserve D2D and Central Virtual Standby) will convert any servers disks to vmdk or vhd format from the backup file.
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