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Converting Ethernet Connector to USB Port

Posted on 2011-09-30
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
I have a printer and a media player which both have female ethernet connectors and which I would like to connect to a home network using USB wireless internet adapters rather than cables.
I found a Female USB to Male Ethernet RJ45 Connector Adaptor (which will allow me to use a USB network adapter) but wonder if all adapters are equal. That is, is there anything special or different about an RJ45 connector for use with a 802.1n MIMO network speed than say an RJ45 used for a much slower connection.
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Question by:Marina2006
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by:
rindi earned 1428 total points
ID: 36890929
Can you post a Link to the adapter you found? The reason I ask is that I don't think that device will really support what you want to do. That way we may be able to check it's specifications.
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by:Gary Case
Gary Case earned 288 total points
ID: 36891689
The adapter you've found is fine => basically all USB -> ethernet adapters work in the same way ... simply converting USB to ethernet.

However, it's not clear what you mean by "... is there anything special or different about an RJ45 connector for use with a 802.1n MIMO network speed than say an RJ45 used for a much slower connection."    ANY wired port (i.e. RJ45) will be FASTER than a wireless connection (e.g. 802.11n)
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by:rindi
rindi earned 1428 total points
ID: 36891763
You will definitely not be able to use that to connect a USB WLAN stick to your printer. Whether it can be used for your media player depends on the player.

The reason is that you'd have to configure the WLAN adapter to connect to your wireless Access Point, and that configuration can only be done on the system it is attached to. For that you need an OS like Linux or Windoze etc. On a printer you just wouldn't have the ability to do any configuration.

To get a printer without internal Wireless adapter connected to a Wireless LAN you'd need a wireless print server, something like the product below:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833262001

Another thing that would probably work is to get a wireless bridge:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833315097

You'd then just have the bridge close to the printer and media player, connect all together with ethernet, and the bridge then connects to your normal wireless network.
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Author Comment

by:Marina2006
ID: 36891775
1.) I meant would the RJ45 port or connector be different depending on the router speed or could I use this adapter to convert an wired port into a wireless one.

2.) Just to clarify I can use this adapter to plug a usb wireless network adapter into and network a printer and a media player without the use of some sort of ethernet wireless bridge.
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by:rindi
rindi earned 1428 total points
ID: 36891829
You can connect the adapter but you can't configure it. You wouldn't be able to build the connection to your Access Point, or input the Pass-phrase etc. Also the printer wouldn't be able even to recognize the wireless adapter and load it's drivers.
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Assisted Solution

by:moonie42
moonie42 earned 284 total points
ID: 36891891
You'll probably be better off getting something like this:
Netgear Universal WiFi Internet Adapter (WNCE2001)
http://www.netgear.com/landing/wnce2001.aspx
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Author Comment

by:Marina2006
ID: 36892113
Thank you for all your contributions I think the Netgear (moonie42) would be ideal for my purposes. One thing I am unclear on is I understand the adapter allows you to join the network but does that mean it takes up one of the ports on your router or does it add a port to your router.
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by:rindi
rindi earned 1428 total points
ID: 36892159
It works the same way a bridge works. It connects wirelessly to your wireless router or access point, and then you connect your player or printer with ethernet wires to the device itself. But as it only has one ethernet port you'd need either two of them (one for the player and one for the printer), or an additional ethernet switch so you can add both. The wireless bridge I mentioned includes a four port switch so you can connect both devices to it without an additional box.
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Author Comment

by:Marina2006
ID: 36892227
Thank you rindi yes I know I would need to purchase 2 of them the appeal in this case is that the media centre and media player would not need to be in close proximity of one another.I have checked the prices in Oz and they are reasonable.
Your wireless bridge however is wonderful for items in close proximity which I am interested in for something else. How do the switchs work do they take up one ethernet port on the router and you switch to the item you wish to use?
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Author Comment

by:Marina2006
ID: 36892349
Sorry I meant that the printer and media player woudl not need to be close to one another.
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 1428 total points
ID: 36892351
A wireless switch connects to the other wireless routers via wireless. That's the point of a bridge. It connects a wired LAN to another wired LAN via wireless. So you don't have to use a wire to connect it to your main wireless router. I see that two of these would be about the same price as one wnce2001. In my opinion you'd get more for your money.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Marina2006
ID: 36892980
Thank you very helpful.
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