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Getting a new server need advice on migration.

Our organization is going to buy a new server in the coming weeks with SBS 2011. Currently we have ancient HP SBS 2003 box that has been nothing but a nightmare for me since I started this job, not even going to get into it. That being said we have also lost some staff so by the time we get the new server we will only have 4 or 5 active employees. At certain times of the year when we have interns and such we have up to 14 users.

I am wondering what the easiest way to migrate will be. I don't really need the old employee's email so I will just need to migrate the 4.

We also have about 10 shared folders with 150GB of files and sub folders.

I was thinking I could maybe just recreate the user accounts on the new server since there are so few at the moment and then just import the email. Would this be the correct way to go about this?

Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks
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lgg733
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lgg733
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
A migration, especially if you haven't done one can be very time consuming. Copying the data and just exporting/importing the mailboxes would be much faster and I suspect if you have had problems with your SBS 2003 ther may be some serious issues you don't want to carry forward.
Just export the user's mailboxes within Outlook to a .pst file, create the new users and set up Outlook, then import the old pst files.

Keep in mind with SBS ALWAYS use the wizards when setting up your server and user accounts. Not doing so will result in problems you will chase for years.
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lgg733Author Commented:
@RobWill this is exactly what I am thinking. There are most certainly serious problems with the SBS 2003 box and it was not set up correctly by a long shot. In the two and a half years I have been working with it I have chased down numerous problems just like you have mentioned. The partition table on E: is corrupt for one. Also for some reason the consultants they were using at the time set them up with an external raid enclosure which the OS boots off of which has caused me problems.

So basically should I just set up the new SBS2011 box in the same way, so, same domain name and server name, ip etc? Then just create the user accounts and copy over the shares and just replace the 2003 box? Would this method work. I want to keep it as simple as possible and get a fresh start.

Thanks

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Rob WilliamsCommented:
If you are going to have both servers on the same network during the migration it is best, though not completely necessary to have slightly different internal domain and server names, just because of DNS. However you will likely only have them connected long enough to transfer the data.
So.....yes, just create a completely new server and transfer your data.
-For Exchange with only a few users, as mentioned you can choose to export/import the data to pst's from the desktop.
-The other catch is if using redirected folders for users My Documents, desktop and Favorites (default), SBS 2008/2011 now hide those folders on the server to the admin. You may also want to do those from the desktop level instead of server to server.
The other issue is SBS should most definitely be your DHCP server. DHCP will shut down on one of the servers when it sees DHCP enabled on the other server. That is easy to deal with, just be aware to restart when done.

I have no idea how familiar you are with SBS, but technicians who are very capable with other server O/S's often to try to configure some features manually. It is imperative you stick to the wizards. Once set up run the connect to the Internet wizard, followed by the set up your internet address wizard, then use the wizards to customize your server and create user accounts.
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lgg733Author Commented:
Thanks Rob I will take your advice.
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