deploy a DLL

I have signed an assembly, complied it, dragged the assembly to the GAC folder within the Setup project in my solution.

Now what?  If I want to deploy this DLL on a machine, now what?
LVL 1
HLRosenbergerAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
If you can get an administrator to install the application, yes.

Otherwise, the alternative is to install the dll in another directory and use a CodeBase instruction in the application configuration file to tell it where the dll is installed.
0
 
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Compile the Setup project.

This will generate a Setup.exe and an accompanying .msi file. Bring both to the target machine and run Setup.

Notice that because you ware installing your dll in the GAC, the user must be an administrator on the computer in order to perform the installation.

If that dll is used only by on application, it would be better to simply leave it in the appication folder. In .NET, this is the recommended place for a dll that is not shared by many application.
0
 
HLRosenbergerAuthor Commented:
This DLL is shared by apps, so GAC is the way to go?
0
Cloud Class® Course: Microsoft Windows 7 Basic

This introductory course to Windows 7 environment will teach you about working with the Windows operating system. You will learn about basic functions including start menu; the desktop; managing files, folders, and libraries.

 
HLRosenbergerAuthor Commented:
OK. I made the setup project, compiled it, and ran the install.  I remove the DLL from my BIN directory for my main app.  Now, the app is broke, of course, and does not see the function in the DLL.  How do I get my app to reference the  instance of the DLL that is in/registered to the GAC?
0
 
HLRosenbergerAuthor Commented:
Further question - I code classic VB for year.  I'm familiar with registering a DLL.  How much the same or different is putting a DLL into the GAC?
0
 
HLRosenbergerAuthor Commented:
Also, after running the setup, and specifying a folder, I do not see that folder.  It was not created.  Should I not see my install folder and my DLL?
0
 
HLRosenbergerAuthor Commented:
I should see my DLL in the .NET tab of the Add Reference dialog, correct?
0
 
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
To get the application to see the dll in the GAC.

It will do it automatically, but the dll needs to be the same name / same version / same signature.

-----

If a .NET dll is used only by .NET applications, you do not need to register it. The system will look for it first in the application directory (recommended), and if does not find there, it will look in the GAC. There are alternatives, but this is the default.

.NET dll need to be registered only when you want to access them from COM applications.

-----

If you do not see the folder after running setup, it means:

You might have to refresh Windows Explorer before you see the folder.

Something in wrong in your installation.

One thing is sure, you won't see the dll, because you have removed it from your bin directory.

-----

No, by default, you won't see the dll in the Add Reference, at least not in the .NET or COM tab.

One nice thing to do when you switch to .NET: Forget all you knew in VB6. .NET is different, Visual Studio is different, so nothing works the same as it did before. That is the price to pay to evolve. People you switched from a horse to a car had the same type of problems. And moving from VB6 to VB.NET is, in my opinion, as different as moving from a horse to a car.

In order to get your dll in the Add Reference dialog, you need to store it in a very specific directory on the hard disk or make 3 or 4 entries in Windows Registry.

Most programmers do not do that. When they need to reference their own dlls, they do it through the Browse tab of the Reference window. An alternative, depending on how you work, is to first add the dll to your solution and reference it through the Project tab of the Reference window. Personnally, since I do not work in team, I prefer the latter, because it enables me to always have the source code and the last copy of the dll in my applications development environment.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.