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How to save Visual Studio debug session after bomb for later analysis?

Posted on 2011-09-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I'm test running a program in Visual Studio. I came across an unusual fatal exception. I would like to save everything so I can come back Monday and look at it.

Is there a way to save everything, the current state, all the threads, etc. so I can analyze it later?

Because I'm about to leave for the weekend.
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Question by:deleyd
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by:Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 333 total points
ID: 36895310
Put the computer in Sleep mode. You have that on the Logoff menu. It turns down everything, but leaves just enough current flowing to keep the microprocessor and memory alive. Moving the mouse or hitting the space bar a few times on Monday whould reawake the computer to the state it was on when you left it. I almost never ShutDown my computer, it always goes to sleep, and very rarely will it not awake in the state it was in.
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MikkelAStrojek earned 167 total points
ID: 36896170
Actually intellitrace available in vs2010 should be able to do just that, havn't tried it though
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by:Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 333 total points
ID: 36896904
IntelliTrace is a good tool, but you need the costly Ultimate edition to have it.

And I am not sure that it would answer the need. I think that he wanted to save the application in the state it was, in debugging mode. IntelliTrace just record what happens in a file. It is superb to review what happened before the application crashed, but does not give you the same tools as the debugger. For instance, to prevent it from gobbling up too much processor time or give you too much information, you must filter the type of information you want it to grab. Sometimes, you filter the reason for the problem. In the debugger, you have access to everything but the history.

In my opinion, these are 2 complementary tools.
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