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SharePoint Analytical Startup

Posted on 2011-10-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi All,

 I've been tasked with getting SharePoint up and running from the ground-up.  That includes everything from start to finished (whew).  As I read, I've come to realize that is quite a task!

I'm terms of creating the environment(s), I'm sure I'll be able to figure things out.  My challege is more analytical.  I've purchased a couple books but they don't seem to provide in detail what I think I need.  They speak of information architecture, but don't seem to lay out a high-level plan or steps for where to start or what to do next (e.g., should I be focusing on folders/filenames, how should I be preparing for taxonomy, etc.).

SharePoint experts.  Please share your good good analytical/design guidance and assistance.

Thanks in advance!
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Question by:NovaCharged
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9 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:hiteshgoldeneye
ID: 36896732
Hi,

I assume you want to know how to set up a development environment for SharePoint
, am i right?

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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:jessc7
ID: 36896995
I highly recommend you pick up another book by Scott Jamison:

Essential SharePoint 2010: Overview, Governance, and Planning
http://www.amazon.com/Essential-SharePoint-2010-Governance-Addison-Wesley/dp/0321700759

His book focuses much more on the topics you are talking about. Information architecture, governance, etc.
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Author Comment

by:NovaCharged
ID: 36899554
hiteshgoldeneye - Yes.  That's the technical piece.  I've buit a small-server farm dev using Hyper-V.

jessc7 - That's one of the books that I have.  I've read most of it and purused all.    Given all it says, my question(s) become "now what?"  It enables me to speak the language, but in terms of next steps, I seem to be missing something.  E.G., Just on my own, I've started to interview users to get a real grasp of the organization (org chart like).  I've also identified where files reside and the major processes (high-level steps) which are used within the environment and asked user to provide a wish list of what they would like to automate within SharePoint (kind of requirements??).  Given what SharePoint provides (Sites, Content, Communities, Search, Insights, Composite), my challenge is what to do next and what I should be doing to plan and implement.  Suggestions?
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:hiteshgoldeneye
ID: 36899601
Given that you have started to interview the end users, you must have got a gist of what they would like to do with SharePoint. It could be for say content management like document management, or maybe implementing some custom workflow. You would need to map what they require with what SharePoint offers out of the box. So in essence you would need to have a good overview of what sharepoint offers and relate it to how you could use it to address the organizational need.

Makes some sense?
0
 

Author Comment

by:NovaCharged
ID: 36900009
hiteshgoldeneye - Yeah!  Starting to gel now!  

My users, however, are not familiar with what SharePoint does (I am only to a degree).  We showed them the "What is SharePoint" webcast from the MS site and they in return, provided a list.  I'm counting the list as high-level requirements.  Here are a few questions:

 - Once I've got the Dev environment fully functional, would you say my next steps would be to :

 - Move  documents from the file shares to SharePoint (this is part of content management, correct)
 - Create Sites/Site collections

The two items above seem to be central to everything related to getting an implementation started.  Think this is a good approach?
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LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
jessc7 earned 250 total points
ID: 36900552
I'm not hiteshgoldeneye, but personally, I don't think that's a horrible approach. The only caveat is if the network file shares are a mess. You don't want to move a mess from one technology to another. People will eventually blame SharePoint for their own lack of organization.

You may also consider viewing things in terms of business processes. What business processes are either core to the business and need help, or are business processes that are low hanging fruit to provide examples and momentum in helping other understand the value that SharePoint can bring to their work lives?

Try to think in terms of:
- document lifecycle (who all touches a certain kind of document, and what needs to happen with it?)
- business processes (what is the work happening within the business that needs improvement?)
- offerings (what are requests or information that each part of the business services to either internal or external clients)

If you can work with an area of the business that at least kind of gets it, or is at the very least open to trying, and implement something succesful for them, they can be a case study / referal / advocate to others in the business.
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LVL 13

Assisted Solution

by:hiteshgoldeneye
hiteshgoldeneye earned 250 total points
ID: 36901485
I do agree to the comment above,

you mentioned about
 -Move  documents from the file shares to SharePoint (this is part of content management, correct)
 - Create Sites/Site collections

The order of the steps is reversed in essence you need to first
 - Create Sites/Site collections
 - Move  documents from the file shares to SharePoint (yep, this is part of content management)

each site along with its site collection share the same set of permissions for its end users
So for each department/business process (HR, Sales) within your company that needs to collaborate on SharePoint needs a separate site. So you need to understand the permission heirarchy.

Also understanding SharePoint has 3 aspects-
1. To understand how an end user can interact with it
2. Understand how you can administrate the web site (Central Administration options)
3. Understand what can be custom developed in SharePoint  

Hope this helps
0
 

Author Comment

by:NovaCharged
ID: 36903641
Experts,

The both of you have provided me with an incredible amount of enlightenment.  Perhaps you two should get together and write a book (lol).  Guess I have to close this -- would love for it to go on as I move forward but its probably against the rules.  I'll certainly note the both of you, be submitting future questions for feedback and keeping an eye out for yall.

Thank you so much!
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:hiteshgoldeneye
ID: 36907879
Glad i could help, regarding co authoring a book i have a long way to go before i get to that stage ;)
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