[Okta Webinar] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 507
  • Last Modified:

PC vs MAC graphic design

Hi, I need some help here. I know this topic has been beaten down to death, but I want some recent reviews with today software and technology. I know this will elicit a lot of passionate answers...but, I need help!

To start with, I work in a 100% PC environment, running Windows Server 2003 AD and exchange.

We outsource 100% of our graphic work out, until just recently. We just hired a new marketing director who will be doing some minor graphic designing. The majority of the work will still be out source. Graphic that she is mainly working on is just print work. She will only be using Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Design Standard for her work.

Here are some of my conerns:
- GPO will not work unless we go with a third party software
- Scripts will not work from my research unless its written in perl
- Full access to every single server shares (not good)
- OS X, once on domain can get buggy (long boot up time, dropping from domain, etc)
- IT Staff has no knowledge on MAC
- Support and managing will be difficult or challenging

Below are the specs that I receive from her and my specs on the pc.

iMAC:
i7 3.4ghz
8gb ram
2tb SAS hdd
AMD Raedon HD 6970
OS X

PC:
i7 3.4hgz Extreme ed.
12gb ram
2tb SAS hdd
AMD Raedon H 6870
24" HD monitor
blu ray optical drive
win7 pro 64bit

Can the PC do exactly what the Mac can do? Software, fonts wise, etc...

Thanks in Advance!
0
ZerodotZerodotZerodotZero
Asked:
ZerodotZerodotZerodotZero
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • +5
5 Solutions
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
It won't matter whether the PC and Mac can everything the same.  Many Mac users perceive their computer as being easier to use even when they are doing exactly the same thing as they would do on a PC.  Macs do come with some fonts that aren't normally found on PCs.

I suggest you keep the Mac off the network as much as possible and don't treat it like a PC.
0
 
CanusRufusCommented:
In the past the Mac was the way to go when it came to graphics. They built the computers name and reputation on this and it was so. However, as time has moved forward....There is no reason to do graphics one machine platform vs. the other.
The only difference for graphics is the look and feel of the computer. I know it sounds funny but to an artist this means everything! I would not put the Mac on your network for sole reasons that you are not familiar with it and its running different AV and security software. I would not want to be responsible for a virus/malware porting through the mac into your network.
If they need a system on your network, provide a suitable Windows PC (although transferring files from Mac to Windows and back is a whole new can of worms), or have the mac on you network isolated and not connected to anything unless it's local. VLAN out the internet connection if need be.

PS. For Video the mac is still the way to go but that gap is closing fast as well.
0
 
tharsternCommented:
We deal with mainly Printing Companies, and Mac's are the norm in any 'Studio'.

Consider separating the Mac/Studio network via VLAN or separate network. Shared network storage can be set up if files need to be shared.

There is no reason why the Macs would need to be on the domain at all, in fact most are not in this kind of set up.

Separate internet connection can be set up if required, and also they could have a pc in the studio for any domain related applications, or a virtual machine (parallells/Fusion).



0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
athomsfereCommented:
Yes, it can do exactly the same.

A huge difference between yesterdays Macs and todays Macs of myth is graphic design /  Adobe CS stuff.

Once upon a time, Adobe wrote its products for the Mac OS and the PowerPC architecture. Now Apple uses Intel CPUs and Adobe writes for Windows first and then ports to the Mac OS. All of the traditional edges that the MAC ecosystem had over PCs for Adobe work are gone.

I am not alone in saying this either, though current benchmarks are hard to find.
But read some of this
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/297994-31-help-photo-video-editing-rendering-gaming


Outside of that, there is also the support. Mac OS and your AD will not play all that nicely, some things will work, others will require alot of work to get working and some things won't work at all!
0
 
DavidCommented:
I profoundly disagree with DaveBaldwin.  There are differences that make the Apple product much more productive, efficient, and stable. First, you are running UNIX, not windows.  The system is somewhat closed, in that Apple doesn't let developers put in dozens of different runtimes with different revisions that can conflict and cause instability.  Apple controls the drivers.

Don't believe me?  get a DOS prompt, cd to \
then enter dir mfc***.dll /s

I have no doubt you'll have a half dozen different versions of the same files, perhaps well over a dozen versions of some of these runtimes all over your computer.  All these take up memory when they are invoked, and conflict.  But apple's o/S uses a shared runtime model. One version gets loaded, once.  Less memory overhead.  No registry to corrupt either.  But that is just one of of dozens of reasons the O/S is "better", plenty of others if you start digging.

You use the right tool for the job. If your graphic artist is a mac person, let her use it.  OSX is a tier-one development/porting environment for the latest versions of the best of the best products.  Software runs better and more efficiently on those platforms.  The code is COMPILED and optimized for the processors as well.  Any C developer will tell you that in a windows environment, you can't optimize any commercial software due to all the platforms you have to support and all the different chips that are used.    Threading actually works too, and you can't beat the backup.

Here is a suggestion on a compromise ..  load parallels for Mac, and run XP in a virtual machine/  Parallels lets you drag & drop files and even share directories between the two environments.   So run XP in a VM, use standard MSFT AD utilities, and make that a shared directory that is common between both environments.  I have a half dozen VMs on my mac and it boots windows faster than windows boots windows ;)

If your IT staff is too inept or unwilling to learn something new, then somebody needs a new department manager. When I was i IT, we LOVED to learn new stuff, and it was Christmas whenever something we weren't experts in appeared on the dock.  


 
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
@dlethe, I'm not sure what you're disagreeing with since you didn't address anything I said.  I didn't say anything about differences between the operating systems.
0
 
ZerodotZerodotZerodotZeroAuthor Commented:
^^^ I  agree with Dave. Sounds more of a personal response than anything from dlethe. I just want to find out if there's any obstacles and info on what I stated on my first post. Thanks all for those that are contributing.
0
 
DavidCommented:
I am respectfully rebutting that the "Pc and Mac" are the same, and the difference is pretty much fonts.  I've been writing system software & apps for windows since 3.1, and linux/unix since the early 80's, plus macs since OS X came out.  So many differences that people are not aware of.  I find it grossly inaccurate to claim that the only significant difference between the operating systems has to do with font bundling.

Back to question at hand .. Buy the MAC, run parallels on it concurrently so IT just sees a windows PC running standard XP, or Win7 on the network.  Then user can access the Windows network from within the OSX environment.  That eliminates all the concerns, because she IS just running a windows machine, and all they have to do is worry about a windows machine.  They'll never even know the Mac is on the network ... because they won't see it.

0
 
DavidCommented:
she runs OSX natively 24x7 & Win7 as a VM 24x7.  Parallels even lets you just double click an extension, and if it is a .doc file, it will automatically open up MSFT word, or if it is a PDF it will open up the mac version, if that is what she wants to do.  No file conversions, best of both worlds, easy-peasy.
0
 
ZerodotZerodotZerodotZeroAuthor Commented:
How would that resolve any GPO, logon scripts or security on the OS X side?  She would still be able to access whatever shares she want's without any security restrictions and internet sites.
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I didn't say they were the same.  I did say that it didn't matter if they were and could do everything the same because the user would want her Mac anyway because she thinks it's 'easier'.
0
 
roylongCommented:
If you really need GPOs to function and you cannot deal with a macintosh outside of strict regulations, you have a couple of options:
1. Encourage the employee to use windows:
2. Let the employee use the macintosh but disconnect from the network and let all the design be done disconnected.  If you need to transfer data then use USB data stick.

If you have the resources, you could provide a macintosh and have this blocked on the network (separate vlan) and use a virtualisation solution (vmware or parallels) to run windows on your main vlan for business apps - the user can then only access Internet and secure areas from the VM.  It's also possible to have shared folders between OS X and the virtual windows machine so the user can transfer mac files to network shares.

It's really not worth the hassle to include one mac in a pure AD environment.  I run a mixed mac/windows environment 70:30 and run AD for authentication - we use Thursby software Dave app for better integration into AD for the macs.
0
 
CanusRufusCommented:
DaveBaldwin:

To an artist, the look and feel of the OS and computer means everything! You need to look at it from an artist's perspective. They are not technical and the Windows OS comes across that way. Trust me, there is a reason why graphic artists flock to the mac.
The Windows PC can do everything that the mac can do ( I feel like a kid song here, I can do what you can do but I can do it better) but the environment is not the same.
It's also funny the the Windows 7/vista OS is looking more and more like the MAC X OS series.....
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Is this a new form of arguing?  Arguing by agreeing with someone?
0
 
DavidCommented:
OSX is much more technical than people realize.  How many graphic artists, teachers, and technophobes even know that they are running a UNIX computer, let alone serving as a sysadmin.  That is the true test for sophistication.  The O/S is so tight and well designed that people don't know what is running under the covers, let alone be a UNIX sysadmin.

Also one thing a PC can't do .... Run a legal copy of OS X. :)
0
 
CallandorCommented:
I agree with dlethe - there's no reason to be afraid of modern macs - ever since they moved to OS/X, they are essentially running BSD 4.2, which is a unix variant.  I'm sure you already have unix machines living happily with Windows, and viruses and permissions are not a problem.  You shouldn't constrain the application by the platform for no good reason.
0
 
ZerodotZerodotZerodotZeroAuthor Commented:
Thanks all for contributing to this thread. At the end we felt that PC was the best direction to go for just print work, office apps, and nothing else. All Adobe products are compatible with both OS. Office we already have. At the end of the day It just makes more sense.
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • +5
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now