Increasing windows 7 disk size

EE,

I want to increase the size of my C drive by stealing from my D drive.  The C drive was 60 gig and running out of space, the D drive was 400 gig.  After reading a little bit, I used the windows 7 disk management utility to shrink D by 200, then used the bootit utility to move the data to the end of the disk so I had free space between C and D (this is what I read, and the extend option was grayed out otherwise).  But extending my C drive is still not an option - it's still grayed out.  What do I need to do?  I've attached a screen shot of the disk management software.

Thanks,
Brian
Disk-Layout-Showing-Free-Space.JPG
BrianEKramerAsked:
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FDomingos88Commented:
You need to delete the partition, so the space is unallocated in order to expand the other, in this case delete the 195.31 GB free space (right click - delete) .
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FDomingos88Commented:
In this site, you can find a good tutorial http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2670-partition-volume-extend.html after you delete the partition.
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BrianEKramerAuthor Commented:
Delete partition is not an option - it is grayed out.  The only option is New Simple Volume.
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FDomingos88Commented:
Oh, it's an OEM partiton, these partitions which were created by the manufacturer, have some restrictions, in order to delete it, you have to use the diskpart tool.

You can find a tutorial here http://jaredheinrichs.com/how-to-delete-oem-partition.html .
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FDomingos88Commented:
Sorry, my fault, my previous answer doesn't apply to your issue, please ignore it.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
You can easily do what you want with Boot-It BM  [the free demo will work fine:  http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm ]

Run the included MakeDisk utility and create a bootable CD.

Boot to the CD;  select CANCEL at the first prompt; then OK.

Go to Partition Work.

Highlight the volume in the extended partition; select Slide; and choose 0 free space AFTER the volume.    Wait for that to finish (it will take a while, as it has to move all the data).

Now highlight the extended partition (NOT the volume inside it), and select ReSize.   Make it as small as it allows (this will eliminate the free space inside the extended partition).

Now highlight the extended partition again, and select Slide.    Choose 0 free space AFTER.    This will move the extended partition to the "end" of the disk -- putting all the free space immediately after C:        This operation will take a while (as before, it has to move all the data)

Now highlight the partition corresponding to C:  (you can tell by the size)      Select ReSize and resize it to the desired size.    This operation will be VERY quick.

Done :-)
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
You cannot delete D: drive as you have there paging file. Remove the paging file from D: drive - restart - delete D: and Extended partition - extend C: drive and create new partition of the space left.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Deleting D: won't free up anything unless the extended partition it's within is also deleted.   But I presume the goal is to do this without losing the data in D:  ==> if so, Boot-It will easily do it as I outlined above.

Note:   The reason Boot-It didn't "work" when you first tried it ["... then used the bootit utility to move the data to the end of the disk ..."]  is that you did NOT "move the data to the end of the disk" -- you moved it to the end of the extended partititon it's contained in.    What you needed to do after you had shrunk the size of D: was to resize the extended partition; then move IT to the end of the disk (as I outlined above).      But to do that now, you have to first move D: to the beginning of the extended partition.

... Just follow the steps I outlined above and everything will work just fine.

Note:  If you have Boot-It NG that will work fine -- you don't need to download Boot-It BM (the replacement product I suggested above)
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BrianEKramerAuthor Commented:
I will try this, but I need to fix iTunes first. My iTunes data is the only thing on D, and iTunes is not working: it has lost all knowledge of the files and appears empty.  I can still see the files through windows explorer, though.  It is like iTunes lost it's directory.  I don't want to monkey with the disk until this gets fixed for fear of overwriting missing data that is needed.  Any ideas?
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
If the ONLY thing you've done so far was to shrink & move D:, that shouldn't have had any effect on ITunes -- UNLESS it "thinks" you've moved it to a new disk, since it's now a different size.    I don't use I-Tunes, so I don't know what the parameters are that cause it to reset its internal pointers.    I THINK it defaults to an ITunes folder within your "My Music" folder.   Right-click on My Music, select properties; and click on the Location tab to confirm that My Music is on D:   (or, if you've relocated the ITunes folder to D:, you'll need to find the equivalent setting within ITunes)

In any event, moving the partition around a bit more as I outlined won't change anything from ITunes perspective.
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BrianEKramerAuthor Commented:
Gary -

I think I got my iTune woes settled.  I think iTunes knows where it is located on a disk and thinks it is a new install if it gets moved.  Just a thought.

I have a question regarding your step 2: "Now highlight the extended partition (NOT the volume inside it), and select ReSize.   Make it as small as it allows (this will eliminate the free space inside the extended partition)."

There are 4 blanks to fill in:  1) Beginning free space outside (currently 0). 2) Free space inside (currently 200m)  3) End Free space inside (currently 1m)  4) Free space Outside (currently 1m).

What should they be set to?  Also if you have s second, what is the difference between the partitions and volumes?  What is the free inside/outside beginning /end?

Thanks,
Brian
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
You want 0 free space "inside" the extended partition; and all of it "outside".    I'm on my way out the door and will be gone for several hours -- but I'll respond when I get back if you have further questions.

A volume is a logical disk drive "inside" of an extended partition (which can contain several volumes).    What you need to do is get the extended partitiion moved to the "end" of the disk, so the free space is immediately after C: => then you can easily & quickly expand C:      But to do that, you need to first shrink it -- so you need to get rid of the free space "inside" of it.

If you have any further questions, just ask -- but be patient as it will be a late this afternoon/early this evening before I can reply.    A screenshot or picture of Partition Work would be helpful.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
... by the way, you'll likely have the same issue with I-Tunes, since the physical locations will change.    But it sounds like you now know how to resolve that.
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BrianEKramerAuthor Commented:
Gary - I didn't have to perform two "slides" as stated: shrink D, slide data over, shrink volume, expand C.  It worked like a charm without the second slide.

And iTunes was not affected since it was only moved the one time.

Thanks,
Brian
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
I suspected that might be the case when Boot-It asked the "inside/outside" question ==> it clearly lets you adjust the internal structure of the extended partition without requiring a "slide" to the beginning (as I originally thought it would require).     Since it simply adjusted the free space it didn't have to move the location of the data (D:) --- so I-Tunes was "happy" -- and I'm sure it also did the operation VERY quickly, since there was no data movement required.

Boot-It is a VERY handy tool ... although a bit "geeky".    I use it extensively -- and have never had it fail (if there are structural errors on the disk it will simply refuse to do anything).
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