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Is there any functionality diference between Windows server 2008 Standard x64 edition and Windows server 2008 enterprise edition x64

Hi Experts,

I am in the process of evaluation a client/server application that is perfectly compatible with both versions of Windows Server 2008 standard/enterprise 64 bit

My question is, is there a  functionality diference or limitation between both versions?

I am not asking about features supported or number of processors, or licensing cost, my question is, if you know of any performance or networking issues(number of connections allowed) using Windows 2008 standard edition x64 or if Windows 2008 enterprise edition x64 bits

Regards
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Jerry Seinfield
Asked:
Jerry Seinfield
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1 Solution
 
lwalcherCommented:
If you are not concerned about the difference in maximum supported CPUs, RAM, etc. (which would definitely affect performance) or licensing cost or features, then the answer is "No, there is no difference."
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Jerry SeinfieldAuthor Commented:
lwalcher, I was told there is a limitation in the number of concurrent sessions (network) to a server if we use Windows 2008 standard edition x64 bits

Can you please validate this?
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Jerry SeinfieldAuthor Commented:
If you can validate this with a KB article or technet link, please
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lwalcherCommented:
There are some limits that are specific to certain roles/functions, but those are not general to the OS. That is probably the source of what you were told, though:

"Certain connection limits in Standard make it unsuitable for a few network infrastructure workloads present in some larger organizations. For example, a Standard server can accept no more than 250 concurrent connections for its Routing and Remote Access Service, which handles virtual private network connections. The same limit applies to its new Terminal Services Gateway feature (explained below). Furthermore, Standard lacks a few capabilities present in higher-end editions, such as Windows failover clustering or partner authentication using Active Directory Federation Services."

http://www.directionsonmicrosoft.com/sample/DOMIS/update/2008/10oct/1008lws.htm
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Jerry SeinfieldAuthor Commented:
Do you have a KB article that shows Windows 2008 std x64 vs Windows 2008 Enterprise x64?

Any comparison graph or document you can provide me?

Just trying to identify if there is a need of use Windows 2008 enterprise edition because the performance is better and other capabilities that I am not aware of that Windows server 2008 standard is not able to support

In my case we must deploy a client server application that runs IIS, and SQL DB plus a connection server, so we need special justification to but the enterprise edition since the application is officialy supported for both versions, standard and enterprise edition
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lwalcherCommented:
No comparison graph or KB article because they are the same from a network performance standpoint (same network stack). For IIS/SQL, there is no good reason to use Enterprise unless the app has extreme memory or CPU needs.
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Jerry SeinfieldAuthor Commented:
Hi Everyone,

Thanks for all the answers.

I would like to know, if the same answers also apply for Windows server 2008 std 32 bit vs Windows server 2008 Ent 32 bits?
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lwalcherCommented:
Yes. As in the 64-bit version, there are some limits that are specific to certain roles/functions but those are not general to the OS:

"Certain connection limits in Standard make it unsuitable for a few network infrastructure workloads present in some larger organizations. For example, a Standard server can accept no more than 250 concurrent connections for its Routing and Remote Access Service, which handles virtual private network connections. The same limit applies to its new Terminal Services Gateway feature (explained below). Furthermore, Standard lacks a few capabilities present in higher-end editions, such as Windows failover clustering or partner authentication using Active Directory Federation Services."

http://www.directionsonmicrosoft.com/sample/DOMIS/update/2008/10oct/1008lws.htm

This is not specific to x64 or x86 architecture.
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