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Switching capacity

What is the normal switching capacity of a typical houshold dsl switch/router? I would assume that a regular switch with 5 x 1 Gbps full duplex ports would have a switching capacity of 10 Gbps. Or are there switches that have a swwitching capacity that is lower then full speed on all ports?
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itnifl
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itnifl
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3 Solutions
 
Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Many - if not most - small switches have smaller throughput than the aggregate of their port speeds.
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SouljaCommented:
I agree, most soho router/switches don't even get half of the switching capacity of all of their ports combined.
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itniflAuthor Commented:
I guess the producers never tell about this? Do you have any examples of products were low swiching capacity is documentet in the product overview?
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Most home users don't care.  Your Internet connection is maybe a few Mb/s so as long as your backplane can keep up with that, port-to-port speeds don't much matter.  It's usually only when WAN (Internet) speeds are higher that people notice their router is a bottleneck.
http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=4687
http://forums.techguy.org/networking/732936-netgear-wireless-router-throughput-problem.html


Here's a chart that shows relative throughput speeds for several routers.  Note these are LAN to WAN speeds, not LAN to LAN.
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/view
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-charts/view
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