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Choosing RAM


Hello there,

I want to build my PC and want to know which is better overall and why

8192MB (4x2GB) 1333MHz DDR3 Dual Channel Memory

4096MB (2x2GB) 1600MHz DDR3 Dual Channel

cheers
zolf
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zolf
Asked:
zolf
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5 Solutions
 
zolfAuthor Commented:

and HardDisk

500GB - Momentus XT Solid State Hybrid Drive

600GB - SATA-II, 10,000rpm, 16MB Cache
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ReubenwelshCommented:
Hi,

With memory more is better 99% of the time. the speed of memory might give a 5% boost one way or another, but considering your comparing 8gb with 4gb, 4gig will win every time. If you where planing on pressing in 64gb vs 48gb for a client you might be better with the faster ram, but for this little the speed wont matter.

Regarding the harddrive, the SSD will be the faster option. SSD disks dont have any mechanical parts so are silent and a lot faster then normal disks.

Not to mention a 10K RPM Disk will be pretty noisy.
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zolfAuthor Commented:

thanks for your comment,can you please tellm ewhat does 1333MHz and 1600Mhz mean
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sayyedsaarCommented:
If you plan on overclocking the cpu, then 1600mhz ram is probably oyur best bet. the 1333 mhz ddr3 ram is just that. it is ram that runs at 1333 mhz. but the actual ram spead is half of that since it is double data ram, that's what ddr stands for. so if your motherbaord has an effective 666mhz fsb 1333mhz ram would be best to use for overclocking. but if you plan on pumping the fsb to 800mhz then the 1600mhz ddr3 ram would be best.

In core i7 things get a little trick because the memory controller for the rasmis no longer on the motherboard, it is in the cpu. so the traditional bus speed that determines ram speed is nolonger the. but in the cpu, there is a controler that emulates the old fsb speed so the ram has somehting to go off of. If you overclock you cpu to 3.5-3.6GHz your are effectively overlcicking the FSB to a quad pumped 1600mhZ. but the original fsb the one the ram decides it's speed on, is only 400mhz. so in this case, both ddr3 1333 and 1600 mhz ram will do the job. but the 1600 will do it with a much easier time. just make sure to buy the ram with the lowest latency. that will matter WAY more than ram with the higher clockspeed. it won't matter if I finish the race 10sconds before oyu. if oyu begin the next race 20 seconds befor eme, then I will never b able to catch you. it's the same idea with latency.
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sayyedsaarCommented:
If you plan on overclocking the cpu, then 1600mhz ram is probably oyur best bet. the 1333 mhz ddr3 ram is just that. it is ram that runs at 1333 mhz. but the actual ram spead is half of that since it is double data ram, that's what ddr stands for. so if your motherbaord has an effective 666mhz fsb 1333mhz ram would be best to use for overclocking. but if you plan on pumping the fsb to 800mhz then the 1600mhz ddr3 ram would be best.

In core i7 things get a little trick because the memory controller for the rasmis no longer on the motherboard, it is in the cpu. so the traditional bus speed that determines ram speed is nolonger the. but in the cpu, there is a controler that emulates the old fsb speed so the ram has somehting to go off of. If you overclock you cpu to 3.5-3.6GHz your are effectively overlcicking the FSB to a quad pumped 1600mhZ. but the original fsb the one the ram decides it's speed on, is only 400mhz. so in this case, both ddr3 1333 and 1600 mhz ram will do the job. but the 1600 will do it with a much easier time. just make sure to buy the ram with the lowest latency. that will matter WAY more than ram with the higher clockspeed. it won't matter if I finish the race 10sconds before oyu. if oyu begin the next race 20 seconds befor eme, then I will never b able to catch you. it's the same idea with latency.
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dbruntonCommented:
>>  but considering your comparing 8gb with 4gb, 4gig will win every time.

Pardon?

The 8 Gb may be slower but may prove more useful than a straight 4 Gb.  This depends on your OS.  If it is a 64 bit OS then I'd go for the 8 Gb.

-----------------------------

SSD hard drive yes.  But also consider two drives, a SSD and a normal SATA 2 hard disk.  Get an SSD that can accommodate your OS and apps.   A 100 Gb SSD might be enough  (depends on your needs).  You use the SSD for the OS and apps and the normal hard disk for your data.  The data on the SSD won't change much but that on the normal hard disk will.
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ReubenwelshCommented:
Sayyedsaar: Sure if your overclocking the memory matters more, but i think its pretty obvious he isnt going to be doing it considering the question :).

Zolf: the MHZ is basicly just the frequancy the ram runs at. Unless you are doing heavy dataprocessing it shouldnt matter.
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ReubenwelshCommented:
dbrunton: Lol i meant the other way round :)
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nobusCommented:
>>  I want to build my PC and want to know which is better overall and why  <<   impossible to answer; you should use the recommended ram from the motherboard's QVL - otherwise you risk unstability
the momentus drive will handle small R/W operations as fast as an SSD, but if you copy large files - it falls down to normal speed see the conclusion here :  http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/seagate-momentus-xt-hybrid-hard-drive-ssd,2638.html
an SSD or the 10Krpm drive will keep their speed
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garycaseCommented:
e.g. memory:   8GB is clearly better than 4GB as long as you're going to install an x64 OS  [with an x32 OS there's no reason to install more than 4GB]

However ... use 2 x 4GB modules rather than 4 x 2GB modules.    The bus loading for 2 modules is FAR lower than it is with 4 -- so the memory subsystem will be notably more reliable.    It's also best to use 1.5v modules, which is the DDR3 standard voltage.   Many high-performance modules require higher voltages, which are NOT automatically set by the SPD, so you have to adjust the voltage in the BIOS.    Here's a set of 1.5v DDR3-1600 modules:  http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233196

e.g. disk drives:   The "solid state" drive you listed is NOT a solid state drive.    It's a standard 7200rpm drive with a small built-in SSD (4GB) that serves as essentially a high-speed non-volatile cache to speed up access to frequently used data.     This DOES help quite a bit with many disk operations -- but anything not in the SSD cache will be accessed at traditional 7200 rpm drive speeds.    The 10,000 rpm drive you asked about will be much faster than the hybrid drive for anything that wasn't cached.

The ONLY reason to use a hybrid drive is if you can't afford an SSD for your main system drive -- that will be FAR faster than the hybrid.    I'd use an 80-120GB SSD as the primary OS drive;  and a higher capacity drive for your data -- that drive could be either of the drives you asked about.     But if you can only afford a single drive, the Momentus XT hybrid is a very good choice.
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SiliconWolfCommented:
Hi  Zolf
Some very good advice above.
However, if you could shed some light on the purpose of the build we can tailor the advice to suit.
The components you mention are only part of the puzzle, the motherboard, CPU and power supply will also have an impact on your choice.

Hear from you soon.
Regards,
Steve
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