Is there a way to track what was viewed or changed via ODBC?

If a user connected to the IBM iSeries via the IBM Client Access ODBC and linked to a file, is there a way to

1) know who viewed which files?
2) know if they changed any data and which files/fields?

Thanks!
PROEUGAsked:
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorCommented:

The easiest way is to start journaling on the files you're looking to monitor. Then, you can monitor ANY use or change of the files in question using the DspJrn command.

HTH,
DaveSlash
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PROEUGAuthor Commented:
We do journal our files.  Are you saying that even using ODBC, the iSeries OS will journalize who the user was, what file he/she accessed, and assuming the before/after images are available, that the journals would capture any changes made through ODBC?  That would be fantastic and seemingly answer any auditor's concern.
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorCommented:

That's absolutely correct. Journaling logs all the changes and who made them.

-- DaveSlash
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PROEUGAuthor Commented:
This is all hypothetical because we don't usually have users setting up their ODBC connections where they are allowed to update data on the iSeries, just read.  However, this doesn't mean someone out there did not configure their ODBC parameters to prevent updates.  Just that we've never bothered looking in the journals for any possible ODBC originated updates.  I guess we'll start looking for any journal records with strange job names.

Thanks much and I will accept your answer.  Wish there was something quicker and easier inherent to the iSeries and ODBC to use than journals, i.e. some special log file, but your answer makes sense and falls in line with a uniform method for tracking file access.  Thanks again!
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorCommented:

There are other options, but they're more complex and some of them even cost extra money. I prefer "native" and "cheap" solutions.

I usually do a DspJrn to an outfile and query the resulting table. It makes the data easier to manage than scrolling through pages and pages of stuff on the green-screen.

-- DaveSlash
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PROEUGAuthor Commented:
I agree Dave.  We just got hit with an audit and the journals - once enabled - proved to be a blessing.  I had to quickly learn DSPJRN and how to query the outfiles.  Funny thing is, I used MS Access to then create an application to report and create file extracts for the users and auditors.  I should check the journals for my own ODBC access!  LOL!

I think the company did purchase some third-party software that also monitors file access, but I'm not familiar with it.  I did mention this to the person asking but she was looking for a quick answer.  You guys on Experts Exchange are about as quick as an answer I could hope for.  Just hope this person buys into the answer!  :-)

Thanks again Dave.
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