• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 333
  • Last Modified:

SSD Raid0 recommended block size

Hello,

I to create a RAID 0 with two Vertex 2 on a Intel ICH10 RAID controller. What is the recommended block size for SSDs. When you google the issue then you find people saying something between 4k and 128k. Well that is a pretty wide range. What is the best block size. As small as possible or a big as possible. As the end result of course I want the best read\write performance.

People's personal expiriences are very welcome.

Thank you
Marcus
0
Mc2102
Asked:
Mc2102
  • 3
  • 3
2 Solutions
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
Best performance is relative to your specific I/O requirements.  Do you do more random, read, writes, sequential .. what is the mix now?  Are you doing SQL server, video streaming, what?

0
 
Mc2102Author Commented:
The machine is running Windows 7 and will be used for daily work like Office etc and Gaming. No database server or any other of these heavy usage apps.
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
Then it would be foolish to RAID0 the SSDs.  Go RAID1.
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
Mc2102Author Commented:
Why? RAID1 only gives me redundancy but not a performance boost. Its just a workstation.
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
You have bad information.   Performance has two components IOPS and throughput.  Performance is mutually exclusive. The higher the throughput, lower IOPs.  You'll be doing more small block and random I/O then large block sequential.

Furthermore, if you turn of that cheesy piece of junk RAID controller chip (the work is done by the device driver), and let the O/S do software RAID1, then you get load balancing.  Each disk in perfect world does 50% of the reads.  

You need RAID1, not RAID0 due to how you use the computer.
0
 
CallandorCommented:
SSDs don't behave like regular hard drives, so the rules for RAID setups are not the same.  Most RAID setups are geared to get around drive head latencies, which SSDs do not have.

In addition, SSDs in RAID arrays do not support TRIM - you still have regular garbage collection, but that is not as efficient as TRIM, and your drives will suffer once they start using up all free space.
0
 
Mc2102Author Commented:
Thank you for the helpfull information.
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

  • 3
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now