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hub to switch upgrade problem

I would like to update a location that is using an old 10MHz hub, but I am very perplexed.
When I replace the hub with a switch I encounter some connectivity problems. Some computers have faster connections as I would expect, but some computers can't connect at all.
Tried a Gigabit switch then a 10/100 switch, different brands, one new and one used. The used switch I took from a working environment where I knew all of its ports were in use and working.
The network cabling at this location is very old and is in a rough use environment. Some of it is Cat 3.
If I put the hub back into place then all computers connect ok.
Dell server running 2003, 8 client computers running Win 7 or XP, cable modem, Cisco RV220W router.
What could be going on here?
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Bill Simpson
Asked:
Bill Simpson
2 Solutions
 
InteraXCommented:
It could be the autonegotiation on the links failing. On the ports that aren't working, try setting the links to 10Mb Full Duplex. If that doesn't work, try 10Mb half duplex.

I would suspect the cat3 cables causing the problem.
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ccsionlineCommented:
Cat 3 or station wire, is an unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable designed to reliably carry data up to 10 Mbit/s.

Have you tried different cables to the workstations that wouldn't connect?

Hook up your new switch.
Plug a computer that connects 100/Mb to the switch port that a non-connecting computer is plugged to.
If computer still connects, then it may be a cabling or NIC issue for the computer that won't connect.

Pretty sure replacing cabling, possibly NIC's, should resolve your situation though.
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techhealthCommented:
Cat 3 will definitely be problematic for GBE, or even for Fast Ethernet/100.  To test if the cabling is the issue, try connecting your switch directly to problem computers with a known good CAT5/5e cable.  If your computer can detect and connect correctly with the port, you know the cabling is the issue.  

If the cable isn't the issue, check if your switches are auto-sensing.  Also check if your computers have old Ethernet cards.  Some old devices just can't work with faster switches (esp. printers).
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Ernie BeekCommented:
Agreed, first get cat5/5e and I think most of your problems will disappear.
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Bill SimpsonAuthor Commented:
I had assumed that a switch would auto-sense down to whatever slower speed might be needed to make the connection. It appears that the existing lines required a slower speed then was possible for connection. Thanks for the help.
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