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Posted on 2011-10-11
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I have a client that uses these industrial computers http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/groups/literature/documents/pp/6181fp-pp001_-en-p.pdf

They have win xp with a core duo processor at 1.2GHZ and 4GB DDR2 memory.

They run a large application on them that would benefit from being virtualized and they already use vmware. These systems are stand alone and not on a network. I dont think there is enough hardware there to install vmware workstation running a virtual xp with their application.

My question is could they run the free esx server on this desktop hardware and run their xp vm with their application from the esx server?

Would this work?
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Question by:ATL74
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 2000 total points
ID: 36948808
The desktop hardware may not be suitable for use with VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi 4.1 or ESXi 5.0).

Check if the hardware is on the HCL, Hardware Compatibility List -
http://www.vmware.com/go/hcl

The problem, is likely to be non-compatible storage or network controllers. But even if the hypervisor did run, they would need another PC to connect and manage the hypervisor as it's bare metal, there is no way of using a Virtual Machine from the console of the PC with the hypervisor on it.

I do not think there is enough resources to run the hypervisor and an XP VM.

Personally, Poor idea, and not sure it would work.
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by:ATL74
ID: 36949091
So I guess the only option is better IROn and run workstation and xp on xp?
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 2000 total points
ID: 36949117
Yes, better hardware. Always remember that a Type 2 Hypervisor is always slower than the host.

Type 2 Hypervisors are SLOW.  In most reviews and experience, they perform at roughly 30-40% hardware capability.  That means an OS in a VM run off VMWare Workstation will likely perform at best like it has an 800 MHz CPU if you have 2 GHz physical CPU. You install Type 2 hypervisors onto of an existing host operating system.

If you use a Type 1 Hypervisor, you get MUCH better performance. ESX, ESXi, are all Type 1 hypervisors - they (based on experience and reviews) typically get 80-90% hardware capability - so that same VM run off the same 2 GHz CPU should operate more like it has a 1.6 GHz CPU instead of 800 Mhz. Type 1 hypervisors are installed on the bare metal of the server.
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