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Shutdown > 9 Windows updates = curious results.

Posted on 2011-10-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
When I was preparing to shut my computer down, I noticed the "windows update" icon.
So, I clicked that. As usual, it said do not turn your computer off, it will turn off after the updates. Ok, the day's pc use was over.

Today, I turn the computer on and it is slow to bootup. I got to a solid black screen. And it sat there. I tried to write down what it said but only got this much:
7626/7626/registry.........etc.

Then it slowly got to the desktop.
Twice I tried to open a browser (IE9) and it would not open.

Also on my lower right hand corner toolbar was this icon: "safely remove hardware."
I never added any new hardware, so why would that icon suddenly stop being "hidden?"

So, I tried, "restart." Again it was slow to boot. I got to a screen similar to "safe mode."
At the top it said Windows failed to start, A hardware or software......then way down the page, I think it was set on "start windows normally." I never pressed my enter key to proceed since I was trying to read and write down the message. It proceeded to start up, normally, on it's own.

Then it booted to the desktop.
I right clicked on the tool bar and hid the "new hardware" icon.

I first went to Hotmail and for a minute or two things did not work normally. I got live.com is not responding. I then opened Windows Mail. Five new messages. I tried to click on 3 of them to delete them and there was resistance.
Finally, everything seems to be working properly, at the proper and normal speed, proper page loading etc.

What about these 9 updates caused all of this?
Is there a way to find out what the updates were?
Why did the "remove hardware icon" become visible?
What about the two black screen messages?
What are the consequences of doing a system restore to a date before those 9 updates?
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Question by:nickg5
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by:ddiazp
ddiazp earned 700 total points
ID: 36968415
System restore usually fails (at least for me) but there wouldnt be any consequences, I believe what happened was Windows provided a driver for a component on your machine (usb drivers, mice, microphone, headset?) and had some issues installing.

You can go to Control Panel->Programs and Features, and select the box that says 'Display all items' or something like that (that shows updates installed), and sort by installation date. That could tell you what was installed.
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Jim-R earned 1100 total points
ID: 36969249
Your computer was likely just real busy sorting out all the new information the updates provided.  Figuring out what may or may not apply to your particular computer (perhaps even scanning your computer with a new "malicious software" removal tool that comes with windows updates from time to time).  Eventually it finished all the extra curricular activity and returned to normal.

You could go to Control Panel, and Device Manager to check for any Yellow "Bang" icons there indicating problems with hardware, but your updates may have found a new driver or somehow found it necessary to temporarily remove and reinstall a device in your system thus the "new hardware" icon showing up as the device was "rediscovered" by the system.

Another thing you can do is look in Control Panel for any problems in "Event Viewer" under "Windows Logs"  There are logs for Applications, Security, Setup, System and Fowarded Events.  The Applications log tracks problems and activity with programs, and the System log records system problems.  These would likely be the two most points of interest.  IE9 or any IE version is tightly integrated into MS Windows, so it's not surprising it would be somewhat unresponsive when your computer is in the final stages of  processing updates.  If you were to restore your system to before the updates, Windows would just request you do them again unless you specifically instruct they be hidden and not shown again.  This is not a good idea if the updates were security related.  The "Display all items or something like that that ddiazp refers to is the "View Installed Updates" item in the upper left hand pane under "Tools" in the Programs and Features Control Panel dialog.

Both of the above Control Panel functions for Device Manager and Event Viewer can be brought out by simply first clicking the "Start" Orb, Right Clicking on "Computer" and selecting "Manage" from the context menu.  Device Manager and Event Viewer are available from the left hand pane of the Computer Management dialog that opens.
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by:nobus
nobus earned 200 total points
ID: 36972583
check if it is also slow when you reboot it
otherwise, install the updates from yesterday
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by:nickg5
ID: 36973350
nobus:
the update installed themselves on shutdown on october 13th.
the slow bootup, with other odd events, happened on bootup the 14th.
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by:nobus
ID: 36973393
i understood that - but if you reboot now - it is still slow ?
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by:nickg5
ID: 36974461
everything works fine now, no further symptoms.
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by:Jim-R
ID: 36974494
By any chance in your updates did you see one for your video hardware?  This kind of update can cause the "safe mode" look you mentioned and the "new hardware found" as it uninstalls and then reinstalls new video drivers.  The system temporarily reverts to "generic" VGA drivers when the older driver is removed and then resumes normally with the new drivers.
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by:nickg5
ID: 36974550
Jim-R:
No, I walked away from the computer when the updates were being installed.
I'll check out the event viewer.
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by:nickg5
ID: 36974649
Jim-R:
You could go to Control Panel, and Device Manager to check for any Yellow "Bang" icons there indicating problems with hardware, but your updates may have found a new driver or somehow found it necessary to temporarily remove and reinstall a device in your system thus the "new hardware" icon showing up as the device was "rediscovered" by the system.

Another thing you can do is look in Control Panel for any problems in "Event Viewer" under "Windows Logs"  There are logs for Applications, Security, Setup, System and Fowarded Events.  The Applications log tracks problems and activity with programs, and the System log records system problems.  These would likely be the two most points of interest.

............no yellow bangs..........
............I have Vista > control panel > system and maintenance > event logs > event viewer > windows logs.
There I find applications and systems.
I'm seeing error and warning, around the time of the updates, etc.
The warnings appear to mention that the registry was in use by another program.
The error appears to be related to IE 9.0 stopped interacting with Windows and was closed.

I've had IE, lock up, or have to close, alot, the last few weeks.
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by:Jim-R
ID: 36974951
You should give FireFox a try.  Not the very latest though.  I am presently using 3.6.23.  See if you have the same issues as using IE9.

I gave up on IE quite a few versions ago, but I still allow updates because of the integration with the OS.  I find FireFox so much better.  Its the add ons like NoScript that give you control over what scripts are allowed and AdBlockPlus that gets rid of so many advertisements helpful in keeping browsing somewhat quicker than without those tweaks.

As far as your update problems are concerned, I think you're past them and you should be OK now.
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by:nobus
ID: 36975175
>> everything works fine now, no further symptoms.   <<   then it looks like it was installing the updates at the first reboot
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by:nickg5
ID: 36976105
thanks
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