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How do I best create four partitions on my Windows XP Pro SP3/Vista Business SP1?

How do I best create four partitions on my Windows XP Pro SP3/Vista Business SP1? And when I do that, will all four partitions automatically be equally sized?

I will soon do a complete reinstall of my whole computer system because my internal HDD got damaged (have an exactly same HDD that I will install: Samsung HM251 JI on 250 GB).

Before I start I have to decide how many partitions I need and size of each partition. My current configuration on my faulty HDD is this:

C: total 78.1 GB (free 35.8 GB)
D: unformatted, don't know the size
E: unformatted, don't know the size
F: unformatted, don't know the size

So when I install Vista Business SP1 from my original CD-ROM (my laptop came preinstalled with Vista Business SP1, I later changed to Windows XP Pro SP3 and removed Vista), and use the built-in diskpart tool to create these four partitions (C, D, E, F), will each be sized exactly the same size? What's the reason that I now can't view the size of D, E, F? I mean, when I earlier installed Windows XP Pro SP3, I think I could choose size for each partition (although I don't remember what sizes I chose for D, E, F). Do D, E, F have any size now or not?

I will use partition C: for Windows XP Pro SP3, D: for Vista Business SP1, E: for some Linux-distribution and F: for back-up/image of the system.

I posted a question some months ago (What is the easiest and cheapest way to partition my HDD and install a Windows Vista Business?, ID 27286584) that relates to this questions and contains information about using the Vista built-in diskpart tool and command-line parameters for the shrink command. But if the partitions get automatically sized the same size, I think I stay content with that (although, perhaps, it's a bit of waste with diskspace to give a Linux-distribution almost 80 GB).
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hermesalpha
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hermesalpha
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1 Solution
 
_Commented:
>> ... will all four partitions automatically be equally sized?

As far as I know, no. Partitions have to be done one at a time. It will usually ask if you want to use all available space. Then you can either state a size or a percentage of the available space.

>> What's the reason that I now can't view the size of D, E, F?

They haven't been Formatted?
You didn't assign space to them?

Right click on the partition > Properties -- and see if it says how much is available.
Or try the Format Option, it should say how much.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Format-option worked:

C: Total 78.1 GB (free 35.8 GB)
D: Total 78.1 GB (unformatted)
E: Total 39 GB (unformatted)
F: Total 37.5 GB (unformatted)
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_Commented:
How are you going to be using the system?

Not sure how to tell you to partition the drive, except make sure your backup partition is big enough.
It looks like you are using about 40GB now, so 4 x 60GB partitions might be a little tight.
And Linux will probably break its partition in to several sections.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
What about these allocations?:

C: Total 70 GB (Windows XP Pro SP3: most softwares installed here)
D: Total 50 GB (Windows Vista Business: only a few softwares installed that doesn't work very well in XP)
E: Total ? (Linux-distribution)
F: Total ? (Backup/disk image)

But I wonder about the F-partition: will I have all disk images here (of Windows XP, Windows Vista and Linux)? What is the proportion I would need, supposing I would use all 120 GB of C and D for softwares? Will I need 120 GB for the backup-partition F then? Or less because I can compress? But what's the ratio uncompressed/compressed?
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_Commented:
>> Will I need 120 GB for the backup-partition F then? Or less because I can compress? But what's the ratio uncompressed/compressed?

I can't really say how much. I don't Image anymore. I do a Clone every few weeks, or if I make a change I want to keep.
But you might want to think about doing the backups to a second or external drive. If your main drive itself takes a dump again. the backups will not do you any good if you can't get at them.
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_Commented:
forgot -- your backups also depend on the kind of backup you do. If you are just doing "data", it will be smaller than doing the whole partition.
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nobusCommented:
why do you need a partition for softwares?   usually, OS and programs reside in the same partition
i never use compressed - disk space is very cheap now, so better buy a bigger sized disk (1or 2 TB) and all your partitioning and space problems are gone
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garycaseCommented:
First, WHY are you using such a small hard drive?    At today's prices you could double the size of your hard drive for an extra $10 ... or quaduple it for not much more [1TB drives are well below $100 these days -- often as low as $60 ... and even a top-of-the-line Caviar Black 1TB is only $90].

Notwithstanding the size of the drive, if you want to run multiple OS's on the drive, I'd recommend you buy a copy of Boot-It BM [$40 -- http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm ] and use it to manage your partitions.     This will do several things for you ...

(a)  It eliminates the 4-partition limit
(b)  It lets you completely isolate each of the OS's from each other -- and all of them will be on their own "C:" drive
(c)  It makes imaging very simple using the integrated Image for DOS/Image for Linux utilities
(d)  You can easily adjust the size of the partitions as needed, should you later decide you'd like them smaller or larger

Simply removing the 4-partition limit makes a multi-boot system VERY handy.    On my main system (the one I'm using to type this), I have two data partitions that all of my OS's can "see"  (so my data's consistent no matter what OS I boot to), but none of the OS's can "see" the other -- and all are on their own C: drive.    And all of this happens on a single 1TB drive.

Here's my boot menu:


My-New-Boot-Menu-with-Win7.jpg
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Ok, seems unnecessary to have four partitions after reading your replies. So I will have the three partitions C, D, E:

C: Windows XP Pro SP3 (most software here)
D: Windows Vista Business SP1 (Mobile Device Center, which works much better than ActiveSync and only works in Vista, plus a few more software that works better in Vista)
E: Linux-distribution

And then, I put the image-backup on one of my two external harddrives.

I'll have to manage with the internal HDD I got right now on 250 GB because the situation is too acute: lots of translation works wait for me so I need to get started as soon as I can with the new harddisk. I live in a small city in mainland China right now, can't spend any time on trying to find something.

The backup I need to do is not only of data, it's of the whole system: operative system, settings, installed software. So I quickly can reinstall from the image if the computer gets virus or the harddisk gets damaged again.

qarycase, do you think I can get on right now without Boot-It BM and create four partitions when I install Vista? Is that the order to go by the way, start with Vista, then XP and last Linux?

Just so I get started tonight: First, make backup of the whole current system with Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011 to my external HDD:

http://www.paragon-software.com/home/br-free/comparison.html

Then, wipe the faulty harddrive I have now and skip the step to try to claim my warranty, I bought the computer in Europe and live in mainland China now. Wipe with my own WhiteCanyon WipeDrive.

Third step: Install Vista Business and use Vista's own diskpart tool to create three partitions during install.

I could do above three steps tonight and let the disk get wiped during the night. Then I continue with Boot-It BM tomorrow.
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nobusCommented:
and where is the backup partition?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
nobus, se coral47's posting here with ID ID: 36983974. He suggests I skip the backup partition and instead put the backup image on my external harddrive.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
But where in Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011 is the imaging backup function? Can't find it. Isn't this working about the same way as Ghost (which I have used and am more familiar with)?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Can't find the imaging function in the interface:

http://screencast.com/t/Njzdgf4b
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_Commented:
Isn't that it toward the top left? Where is says "Backup"?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I should be, shouldn't it? But it says nothing about disk image or anything, only "Backup your harddisk data":

http://screencast.com/t/jwG0vqw8P

Will it create an image of the whole system or just backup data files (no settings or applications)?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Should I choose C partition only to backup (and skip D, E, F as they are all unformatted)?:

http://screencast.com/t/SDqCTMqPxigx

How do I know afterwards that it's an image that I can use to recover from, to install on the new harddisk? And not just backup of data files?
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garycaseCommented:
If you're going to use the built-in Windows boot managers, you should install XP first; then Vista.

However, as I noted earlier, you'll have far better control of the boot process if you do this under Boot-It's control.    IF you're going to use Boot-It, it's MUCH simpler if you install it first -- or at least after you've only installed ONE of your OS's.     That will eliminate any "interference" from other boot managers (XP's, Vista's, or Linux's).    Note that Boot-It is a bit "geeky" -- but NOT hard ... there are several video tutorials on the site; and you can always ask here.    Note also that this resolves the imaging issue, since it comes with its own imager.
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nobusCommented:
you can click on the disk -or partition tab in the menu for it - that's what i do
here a tutorial on it's use :  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ylhq-f9cZYQ
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_Commented:
Happiness is a warm rock?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I received some message from the Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011 application itself when I opened the UI for the first time that the internal HDD was damaged and the program might not run properly. I don't have much choices but to proceed, but what are the odds that, after having created an image and reinstalled a fresh Windows XP Pro SP3 on the new internal HDD, in the end I can't recreate the old computer system from the Paragon-image?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Shouldn't it be quite safe procedure if I proceed like this?:

I create an image backup with Paragon now of the faulty internal HDD, then swap internal HDD to the new one.

One the new HDD I install a fresh uncofigured Windows XP Pro SP3.

Finally, I recover from the Paragon-image to get back my old computer system on the new HDD.

If the final step to recover from the Paragon-image fails for some reason, I can always swap internal HDD again back to the faulty HDD and try to create a new image backup (perhaps with some other imaging software).
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garycaseCommented:
If you plan to restore the image of the old drive on the new, there's NO reason to install a fresh copy of XP -- the restored image will overwrite that.

If you think the image may be okay, it won't hurt to try that.   If it doesn't work; then you can simply reformat the new drive and THEN install a fresh copy of XP SP3.
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_Commented:
whoops. disregard my last post. Wrong Q.   : (

As for the error, while not totally unexpected,  it definitely increases the chance for a bad save a little.
Depends on where the problem is.

Don't wipe the problem drive until you can try the backup.
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_Commented:
I still need to type faster.   : |
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Ok, I'll try now to create an image first, using these settings:

http://screencast.com/t/n31O4SYMZKsM

But it says "Backup mode: Only data and logical structures". Does that mean this is only a partial backup, exluding software applications and settings? I didn't get any alternatives to change any backup mode.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
And I'll do it in normal compression speed/normal compression level (if I choose best possible compression at low speed I'm not sure it will be any better because the disk drive might get "more chances to fail" during longer compression time). And I also don't choose the more time-consuming task to backup sector by sector ("partition raw processing").
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
coral47, to minimize the risk of getting a bad save, do you think I should choose best possible compression speed plus backup sector by sector, even unused sectors (partition raw processing)?
It will take much longer time but that is initself not a problem for me now, the important is to get the image working to recover from.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
By the way, during backup with Paragon, can I have KM Player playing music from internal HDD that is being back-uped, or from the external HDD?
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_Commented:
>> playing music from internal HDD that is being back-uped

Ahhh... you are using the Windows installed version?
It might cause issues. The external should be OK, but either will probably slow down the copy a bit.
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nobusCommented:
i never use it like that - it's abit like sitting on the branch you are sawing...i always get chills then...

>>  but what are the odds    <<   that depends on the actual problem, no way to predict

what i do in such a case :
1- backup data
2-run a disk diag (eg from UBCD : http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/      ) to ensure the disk HARDWARE is ok
3-run a chkdsk on the drive to fix file system errors
4-try again paragon
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garycaseCommented:
There's no reason to do a sector-by-sector backup ... "data and logical structures" gets everything that's on the drive -- OS, programs, etc.      Sector-by-sector is for forensics use or if you're using an encyption utility that stores data in apparently unused sectors.

I'm not a fan of "live imaging"  (imaging from within the running OS) .... and for SURE I would NOT do anything else on the system while the image was being made (including playing music)
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Would this be possible?:

I've made a backup image now that is stored on my external drive. Can I now format partition D on my faulty internal drive (NTFS) and install the backup image on partition D? Just to try if the backup image will work. If it works, I then could proceed to swapping internal drives to the new one and install the backup image on the new internal drive.

But how can I boot from partition D instead of partition C?
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garycaseCommented:
You don't need to format a partition if you're going to restore an image to it => restoring an image will restore whatever format the imaged partition was using.

I'd simply swap drives; restore the image to the new drive -- and see if it works.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Ok, if I swap drives now I still need to install Windows XP Pro first won't I? To be able to use Paragon software that opens the backup images. Or is there any way to recover directly onto the new unformatted completely clean harddrive from the backup image immediately when I boot up for the very first time?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
If I proceed now to swap to new diskdrive and try to recover from the backup image, and it doesn't work, how good are the chances that I'll be able to just swap back to old faulty diskdrive and use Windows XP on that again, trying to make a new image, perhaps with another imaging software?

I mean, before I start, I want to be as sure as I can that, if it doesn't work, I can revert back to the old diskdrive and start all over again.
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nobusCommented:
normally - if you backup the disk to an image, it just works when you swap disks
i don't quite understand what you mean with the latest post - can you explain plse?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I mean, I take out the faulty HDD and insert the new HDD, try to recover the whole system onto the new HDD. But if the backup image doesn't work so I can't recover, can I take out the new HDD and insert the faulty HDD again? And the old system (albeit slow) will work again so I can create a new backup image that, hopefully, will work better. Maybe by using something else than Paragon.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
With the first posting, I mean that I have to go through the lengthy install-process of Windows XP before I can recover from the image? Because I can't recover from an empty computer, can I, directly from the bootup?
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nobusCommented:
i think you misunderstand what the image process does
it copies everything from the source disk to the destination disk -  but not like a file by file copy or backup
it is like as it takes a picture of everything on the disk - in one file - and puts that on the destination disk

So - on the OLD disk, nothing has changed; you can use it as before ; and if the old disk was running, the NEW one will run also

you would be able to swap the disks - and both will work
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_Commented:
>> Or is there any way to recover directly onto the new unformatted completely clean harddrive..

Paragon should have a Option somewhere to make a boot cd/dvd.
Then you can boot from that and Restore the Image.
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nobusCommented:
it's called Recovery Media builder :  http://www.paragon-software.com/home/br-free/screenshots.html
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I tried the image on the new harddrive but it was only initially loaded, after a while I'm prompted to restart my computer to continue the recovery process and after that I receive error notification that it's not possible to recover from this image. I tried several times, swapping between old and new harddrive, but nothing worked with Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011. Because of this error message upon launching Paragon:

http://screencast.com/t/oNGENrEYRC

I also tried to download the installation file for Paragon from another location and reinstall it. But I continue to receive the same error message upon launching Paragon: http://screencast.com/t/oNGENrEYRC

Although Paragon finally launches and I can make an image for recovery, it's apparent that something doesn't work from the beginning with the actual Paragon-application itself.

Later, I tried Acronis True Image Home 2012 and I don't receive any error notification such as for Paragon. But I can't recover only one partition with Acronis (I only want to recover partition C, not D, E and F).

Should I try another imaging software (that can do image from only one partition)? For example Drive Image XML (although I'm not sure it does image from only one partition, have to check it up first)?
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garycaseCommented:
If your partition is corrupt (likely since you noted the HDD is damaged) then NO imager is going to be able to fix your problem => if you image a corrupted partition, then you're restoring the same corrupted partition to your new hard drive.

Time to bite the bullet and just do a clean install on the new hard drive.     After you've done that, connect the old hard drive (either internally or via a USB bridge) and you MAY be able to recover some/most of your data if it can be read okay.
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_Commented:
Ditto on the "bite the bullet".  About the quickest and easiest option at this point.

I am not familiar with Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011 (I use their Hard Drive Manager), but I assume it only does Images, not Clone/Copy?

I did a bad hard drive not too long ago, with pretty good results (ie: nothing critical was on the bad sectors) by doing a "raw" copy.
But it took forever because I had to keep clicking the "found bad sector" popup.

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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
coral47, what's the difference between image and clone/copy? I always thought it was the same thing: image is a clone/copy. And you can recover from image or clone/copy. Apparently it seems it's not the same thing (after reading your reply), but can I recover from both an image and from a clone/copy? Which is the best to recover from? N.B.! I only want to recover one partition: partition C (the other three partitions are unformatted anyway, and I have already created three partitions on the new drive with other sizes than on the old one).

Do you think I also should try to do a raw copy, like you did? How can I do that?

Anyway, I just did a new backup using Drive Image XML without any error message at all (I already had Drive Image installed since earlier). I got about 60 small files on half a megabyte each to recover from. And the XML-file on 64,000 kB. I will try now to see first if I manage to recover from this.
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garycaseCommented:
Creating an image and then restoring from that image is identical to simply cloning the partition.

Doing an uncompressed sectory-by-sector copy ignores the file structure information and simply copies every sector of the partititon -- whether or not it contains any data.    This is useful for forensics analysis;  and MAY help if the disk is corrupted and legitimate data is in some of the unmarked sectors.    But it's very unlikely to make any difference in your situation.

As I noted above, it's time to simply reinstall from scratch.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I'll try at least this new image backup from Drive Image XML. If that doesn't work either, the last thing I could try is to backup sector by sector with Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011. If that also fails, I have no option but to install each program from the old drive one more time on the new drive, program by program. And change settings etc. Would like to avoid that if I only can get one backup right.

Or I could try Acronis Migrate Easy (but I think it only moves the whole system, not a single partition).
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_Commented:
>>  ...try at least this new image backup from Drive Image XML... try backup sector by sector with Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011

Sounds like a plan. I wish you good luck.
But I'm with gary, it looks like this will need a clean install and copy over what you can.

>> Creating an image and then restoring from that image is identical to simply cloning the partition

Well, there is a slight difference between them, but you end up at the same place.  ; )
- You can boot from a Clone as soon as it is made.
- You can't from an Image. You have to Restore it first.

I already had Hard Drive Manager, so I gave it a shot, and got lucky.
When it got to a bad sector on the old drive, it just wrote Zeros to that sector on the new drive.
A few of those in something like picture, music, video files, might never be noticed.
But a few in SYS, EXE, DLL files, you are still looking at a Repair at least.

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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Drive Image XML:

"You cannot restore an image to the current system partition. If you want to do that, you must boot into Windows from something other than this system partition. This can be on another machine or a BartPE boot CD-Rom."

I think I'll try this solution now:

I install Windows Vista Business on my second partition (I've already created four partitions on the new harddisk and installed Windows XP Pro SP2 on the first partition where also Drive Image XML is installed). Then, I recover from the backup image of XP Pro but I do the recovery process from the second partition with Windows Vista Business, using Drive Image XMl, and let the image be placed on the first partition (overwrites current Windows XP with image of Windows XP from old drive).

Will this work? And can I just go ahead now and install Windows Vista Business on the second partition? What about the boot loader, will it automatically add to the bootup menu both Windows Vista Business and Windows XP Pro?
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_Commented:
If I understand correctly, that should work.
I'm not sure what it will do to the current XP listing in the Vista bootloader. It might still work, but there is a chance it will need to be fixed.
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garycaseCommented:
The concept will work ==> but you are making this WAY too hard.    You simply need to restore from ANY imager that supports a boot CD directly to the first partition ==> Boot-It, Acronis, Paragon, etc.

... and the bottom line is almost certainly that you're trying to restore a damaged and non-functional partition ... which will still be damaged and non-functional after it's restored.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I'm beginning to accept the hard truth garycase: Probably I'll continue to get lots of small problems if I should succeed to recover from the faulty drive image, even on the new drive. So I'll follow your recommendations and reinstall program by program on XP.

But I still want to install Windows Vista Business on partition 2 and just tried inserting on the two DVDs I burned long time ago (my laptop came preinstalled with Vista Business SP1). But after having loaded the files in the boot-loader, I get the message that I can restore the whole harddrive to factory settings (I only want to restore/install Vista Business on partition 2). Do you think I will be given the option to install on one of my four created partitions if I click next and continue? Or will it just start installing Vista on the whole harddrive, erasing the other three partitions?
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garycaseCommented:
You're clearly using a set of factory restore DVDs -- not a Vista installation disk.

Time to harness the power of Boot-It ...

(1)  Restore the disk to its factory state with the Vista restore disks.
(2)  Use Boot-It to shrink the partition to the size you want for your Vista system.
(3)  Install Boot-It to the hard drive -- letting it install to a dedicated partition (it will ask you about this when you install it)
(4)  Now use Boot-It to create a partition for XP, and install XP to that partition (watch the tutorial on the Boot-It site before doing this)

Now you'll be able to easily boot to either Vista or XP;  image them;  restore them; etc. -- all from the Maintenance mode of the boot menu (no additional software involved)
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
So there is a solution to this even without the original installation CD! I sent an e-mail to the vendor of my laptop asking him to e-mail the installation file for Vista Business or an image of it but I'm not sure I will receive anything (it was about 3 years ago since I bought the laptop). Probably I'll go for your solution garycase. First restore Vista to factory settings, install Boot-It on Vista and shrink the full Vista size to 50 GB (I'll save 120 GB for Windows XP and 30 GB for two different Linux-distributions)?

I'm not following you about "Install Boot-It to the hard drive": At this point, I have already installed Boot-It in the Vista-partition. Should I install it a second time? And how can I use Boot-It for partitioning and installing XP? Do I have to install Boot-It on two different partitions (four if I include the two Linux-partitions)?
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garycaseCommented:
No, you don't want to install Boot-It until you first boot with the Boot-It CD, select CANCEL, then OK;  and then go to Partition Work and shrink the Vista partition.    That will provide some free space so Boot-It can install to its own partititon -- which is a better way to do it.

THEN boot to the Boot-It CD again -- and this time click on OK at the first prompt, which will install Boot-It to the hard drive.    Then you won't need the CD anymore.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Do you think it could work as well with a free software like Parted Magic, instead of Boot-It BM?
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garycaseCommented:
Parted Magic handles many partition management tasks -- but is NOT a boot manager;  and doesn't implmenet anything close to Boot-It's EMBR ... which is what makes it such an outstanding boot manager.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I tried two times now to restore Vista Business to factory settings, but each time, after the recovery indicator has reached about 3 percent, I receive this error message:

"Error no. 1005. If the problem persists, please contact HP."

And thereafter, when I click OK, the laptop boot again, cancelling the recovery process.

So it seems my two DVDs that I burnt years ago for Vista recovery are faulty.

I have two main options now:

1. I wait until I find a solution how to find a Vista installation file, or try to buy cheap OEM (but it has to be for direct download, don't have time to wait for shipping to me in China). Windows 7 will probably be too expensive, but could I buy it for immediate download? I only want the most extensive version in case I would buy Windows 7 which has multi-language support etc.

2. I go ahead and install Windows XP Pro SP2, install all software so I can start working again. Later, when I find a solution to how to find a Vista installation file I can create more partitions with Boot-It BM and install Vista Business on the second partition. N.B.! In that case, will I be able to do this, install Vista Business on partition 2 and not on the whole harddisk (overwriting existing Windows XP Pro) as is the case with Windows Vista recovery?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Is there any chance I could contact HP and they send me an installation file for Windows Vista Business?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I sent an e-mail to HP Support asking them to e-mail an installation file for Vista Business to me.
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garycaseCommented:
If you install Boot-It BM and then install XP to one partition you can easily install additional OS's later as desired.     But if HP sends you a set of recovery disks, they will likely wipe the entire disk and create an original factory setup ==> so before you use those disks, be sure to image XP (using the Image for DOS component of Boot-It BM) to an external disk.    Then you can do as I outlined about -- restore to factory config; resize the Vista partititon to a smaller size;  then install Boot-It BM;  and then simply restore the XP system that you imaged.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I found quite cheap Windows Vista Business for $200. So to quickly get started with my work again, what do you think about this?:

I install Windows XP Pro again (the partial Vista-recovery already ruined my first installation, have to install XP again). Do a backup/image of XP Pro after I've fully updated to SP3 and installed all software. I wait for the CD to be shipped to me with Windows Vista Business (if I buy it probably it's not the recovery CD but genuine installation which I can install on only one partition, leaving XP Pro as it is). When I get it, I install Boot-It BM and install Vista Business on partition 2, update fully before trimming it down and then install Mobile Device Center to sync my PDA. Finally I install two Linux-distros (Mandriva and OpenSUSE).

For the backup/image of XP Pro, should I use the free Paragon Backup & Recovery 2011 or commercial Acronis True Image Home 2012? I could buy the Plus Pack for Acronis True Image Home 2012 later so, when I purchase a new laptop, I could move the image to dissimilar hardware. Which I also could do with Acronis Migrate Easy (can't see the difference between Plus Pack and Migrate Easy)???
0
 
_Commented:
Either one should do it. So use the one you liked better.
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garycaseCommented:
Agree either Acronis or Paragon will work -- but why bother with either if you're going to use Boot-It BM?    It comes with its own excellent image/restore utility (Image for DOS).
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Yes, it's enough with Boot-It BM isn't it? And it even backup Linux I think.
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LeeTutorretiredCommented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 500 points for garycase's comment http:/Q_27401661.html#37015689

for the following reason:

This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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LeeTutorretiredCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
0
 
hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I would like to award points as follows, and then have this question closed:

coral47 20
coral47 20
coral47 20
qarycase 60 (best solution)
qarycase 20
nobus 20
qarycase 20
nobus 20 (ID: 36990983)
qarycase 20
qarycase 20 (ID: 36998305)
nobus 20
coral47 20 (ID: 37003482)
nobus 20
qarycase 20 (ID: 37012568)
coral47 20
qarycase 20
coral47 20 (ID: 37012970)
coral47 20 (ID: 37013043)
qarycase 20
qarycase 20
qarycase 20 (ID: 37013674)
qarycase 20
qarycase 20
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Please disregard my previous objection, I agree with the award of points according to the moderator's suggestion.
0
 
nobusCommented:
i found your first idea nice...
0

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