?
Solved

RAID mirror and fixing it when it's broken

Posted on 2011-10-19
7
Medium Priority
?
337 Views
Last Modified: 2016-12-08
I want to confirm if I have a RAID mirror on my motherboard (non server gigabyte ga-p35-ds4), and it breaks, can I merely pull one of the drives, throw it in a external case, then copy the existing data onto a brand new mirrored drive set? (via clone, or ghost, or whatever else)?
0
Comment
Question by:mgedlaman
  • 3
  • 3
7 Comments
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 36995491
Normal procedure would be to replace the failed drive with a new one, and then depending on the RAID controller, go into it's setup utility and check whether the new drive has been added to the array and is being synced, or whether you have to manually add it as a member of the array, and then it'll be synced.

Another good procedure would be is to use 3 drives and have one setup as a hot spare. If one drive fails in such a situation the hot spare will automatically take over and get synced, and then you can change the failed drive so the replacement takes the hot spare's place. Of course the controller will have to support this.
0
 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
joelsplace earned 2000 total points
ID: 36995953
To answer you question:
If you already have the mirror in question you can shut down the server take one drive out, ghost it to another spare drive using Ghost's forensic copy to get an exact copy, put your original drive back in the server and start it back up.
Do whatever tests you want with your copy.
The only mirror setups I've run across that won't do what you are speaking of are Adaptecs.  They write to the drive in such a way that you can't just plug them into another controller and read them.
That's and Intel ICH9R.  I haven't personally tried that one.  You should be able to plug it into another board with the same chipset since the RAID info is on the drive and not stored on the chip (Usually).  I've done that to recover a RAID 0 setup when the motherboard failed and it worked like a champ.  All 3 RAID 0 arrays came right back up.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:mgedlaman
ID: 36997331
I guess I should have been more specific.  I was wondering that because I want to have all my bases covered when failures like motherboards happen.

Thank you for the responses gents :)
0
What Security Threats Are We Predicting for 2018?

Cryptocurrency, IoT botnets, MFA, and more! Hackers are already planning their next big attacks for 2018. Learn what you might face, and how to defend against it with our 2018 security predictions.

 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 36997868
A RAID array is for protecting you against disk failure, not mainboard or disk controller failures. For such cases you have backups. Cloning an array to another HD and then trying to use that clone on a new system will only work in the rare cases that you get the exactly same hardware as a replacement. If the mainboard or the RAID controller changes it won't work.
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:joelsplace
ID: 37000482
rindi,
While what you said about moving to different hardware can be true it certainly isn't always true or even usually true especially when in the context of the question.  He was talking RAID 1.  A lot of RAID 1 disks will act just like a single disk when plugged into a non-RAID controller.  I've moved OSs to different hardware more times than I can remember and it's only not worked a couple of times.  There have been times that it was probably more trouble than it was worth but many times that I really didn't have any issues.  This is especially true if the new hardware uses the same brand or series of chipset.  Obviously counting on a RAID 5 to come up on a different controller would be pretty crazy but I did rescue a RAID0 earlier this year on a different controller.  It's still running today.
0
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 37000678
I don't agree that moving to different hardware is usually no problem, at least not with modern m$ OS's. The drivers are usually very different, on XP you apart from that have a good chance that you need to use another HAL, and if you are using an OEM version of the OS moving it to other HW is a big NO!!! anyway. Also, even if it is simple RAID 1, every controller manufacturer does this differently, so unless you happen to use a controller from the same manufacturer cloning it back to the new array probably won't work.

RAID isn't a substitute to a backup, and has never been, and the only real and supported way to go about moving to a new system is to restore your data from a backup.
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:joelsplace
ID: 37000764
I'll agree that RAID is no substitute for a backup.
0

Featured Post

[Video] Oticon Case Study

Open office environments can create the dynamics for innovation, but they also bring some challenges. With over 1,000 employees in an open office, Oticon needed a solution that would preserve the environment while mitigating disruptive background noises.

Watch how they did it.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If you're a modern-day technology professional, you may be wondering if certifications are really necessary. They are. Here's why.
In the below post we have mentioned the best hosting type for startups. Also, check out some of the superlative web hosting companies that are proposing affordable web hosting solutions to host your startup website.
This tutorial will walk an individual through configuring a drive on a Windows Server 2008 to perform shadow copies in order to quickly recover deleted files and folders. Click on Start and then select Computer to view the available drives on the se…
This Micro Tutorial will teach you how to reformat your flash drive. Sometimes your flash drive may have issues carrying files so this will completely restore it to manufacturing settings. Make sure to backup all files before reformatting. This w…
Suggested Courses

839 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question