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Bash profile best practice

Hello,
Can any one provide me best practice to bash profile? Or a good template ?
Thank you.
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tamirmilo
Asked:
tamirmilo
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2 Solutions
 
farzanjCommented:
This is kind of subjective.  Do you have any specifics in your mind?

Do you want to customize the prompt, you will have to have modify PS1 environment variable.

You can set certain aliases for command you frequently use.

You also would set up path to include your current directory so that you don't have to do ./
Just put
export PATH=$PATH:.

You can make the history file very long, I typically make it 100000 commands so that you can recall really older commands as well
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farzanjCommented:
Here is a good reference for you

http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/sample-bashrc.html
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xtermCommented:
There's really no "best" practice for a default profile.  Most modern Unix/Linux systems have a global /etc/profile which gets read first upon login, and then the shell reads the .bash_profile file in the user home directory.

The general line of thinking is that your own personal .bash_profile is a place to override or add to any system variables that don't work for your situation.  For instance, the system may not give you all the directories in your PATH variable that you need access to (like for instance /your/homedir/bin) so you could add a line in your personal profile that says:

PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin
export PATH

Usually a personal .bash_profile will also source (this is like an "include" in programming terms) a .bashrc, so it will look like this:

# Get the aliases and functions
if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
        . ~/.bashrc
fi

What this line says is that "if the file .bashrc exists, read it and source it".  Then in your .bashrc, you'd put aliases for common commands or functions that you use:

alias l="ls -latr"
myfunction () {
  # I can now use this function in all my programs
  echo "Hello world"
}

That's really all there is to it!  Feel free to ask if there's something more you were looking for.

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farzanjCommented:
You typically keep aliases for commands you frequently use

like in ~/.bash_profile file

alias ll='ls -al'
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tamirmiloAuthor Commented:
Thank you,
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