Need to back up Hyper-V Virtual Machines, with ability to restore at the file level... SCDPM 2010?

I have a 2008 R2 Host, using Hyper-V to run two virtual machines.

Virtual Machine 1 is a SBS2008
Virtual machine 2 is a 2008 R2 running SQL Server 2008 for our databases.

Virtual machine 2 also has a shared folder that we use as a public file storage.

I am interested in backing up these virtual machines in a way that I could recover individual files, say a pdf gets deleted off the public file storage on virtual machine 2, where I would be able to recover that file.... as well as a full bare metal backup, where the server burns to the ground, I can restore on new hardware.

I have SCDPM 2010, but have not yet installed it.

I'm assuming I should Install it on the host machine.

Advice and tips on what software to use, and if SCDPM 2010 will do what I'm hoping it will, also best practice for installing SCDPM 2010 in my current configuration.

Thanks
AmericareAsked:
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bill_lynchCommented:
That is not true.  You can back up at the VHD level and then to restore at the file level you can Mount that VHD from inside of Disk Management of another computer.  

From there you can assign that VHD a drive letter as if it were a physical hard drive, browse the file system to the file you want to restore and copy it out of there.
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Svet PaperovIT ManagerCommented:
In order to recovere files within the virtual machines, you need to backup the VM from inside, as an ordinary server.

Backing up on the Hyper-V server level will allow you to restore the VHD files only, not the files in the VHD. You could attach restored the VHD files as local hard disk or to an existing VM but this process is much longer and it is not good for daily restores.
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bill_lynchCommented:
to be more specific you need to mount that VHD from another Windows 2008 R2 Server.  Mounting VHDs is a new feature.
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AmericareAuthor Commented:
What suggestions do you have for installing SCDPM 2010?

I'm assuming the best place would be install it on the Host machine, and back up from there.

Thanks for the replies Bill.
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bill_lynchCommented:
Yes, I would back up the vms from the host.

Keep in mind if you are using Clustered Shared Volumes, you can make the backups from any of the hosts that have access to the shared storage.
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AmericareAuthor Commented:
I'm not that familiar with Clustered Shared Volumes.

We only have the Host, then the two virtual machines...

The Drive array is a raid 50, that's partitioned off in to two drives, C: for the Host OS, and D: which i use for the virtual machines, and VHD's.

Is Clustered Shared Volumes something that would apply to my scenario, and if so, is it too late to apply this now that this set up is in production.

I'm trying to figure out the best solution to cover my backside in-case the worst case scenario happens.

Thanks for your valuable input.
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bill_lynchCommented:
Clustered Shared Volumes is Microsofts file system for Virtualization.

This will probably only come in the picture for you if your virtual infrastructure grows to the point where you would like multiple Hyper V hosts to act in tandem so that you can move virtual machines back and forth between the hosts with no down time (VMWware calls this vmotion, with Hyper V it is Live Migration)

You would also need Microsofts System Center Virtual Machine Manager Product to implement this.  

You can always migrate your vms onto something like this whenever you have the need.
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AmericareAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your time, and input.

I'll setup SCDMP on my host, and go from there.
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AmericareAuthor Commented:
I'll research more on the best practices for installing SCDMP 2010 on a hyper-v host.

Mounting the VHD is an acceptable solution if file level restoration is needed.
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Svet PaperovIT ManagerCommented:
Restoring a VHD just for couple of files can be quite long. I don't know how big your data partitions will be but you are looking at something about 100GB per hour as restore time. On other hand, using the integrated Windows Server Backup (in Windows Server 2008 R2) you can perform a file level restore in matter of minutes.

Also, backing up a VM with SQL database DOES NOT provide a valid backup copy. You have to use the SQL Manager to backup the DB and the Tranasction logs.

Bottom line: suggest you to reconsider and read a little bit more about the subject.
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