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Vista H Premium printer sharing

Posted on 2011-10-29
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
I have two computers in a home using W7 home premium.

Using the home network with the shared key worked, until I left the client, then it stopped working and I can
not get it going again.  I set the network group to 'work' and was told that then I must leave the home sharing function???

Anyway, I can not get the laptop to share the printer with the desktop upstairs.  They are on the same network segment, the printer is shared, and the administrator accounts on both computers are the same with the same password.  The computers however are logged in to a limited account, I am not sure they are identically
named with an identical password.

So 15 years of Windows networking and I am a little stumped!  I appreciate the time that it takes to reply!

Thanks,
gsgi
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Question by:gsgi
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Expert Comment

by:skarai
ID: 37050397
Does the printer provide a direct Ethernet port or a wireless connection? In that case I would assign a static IP to the printer and let the machines work with it like a network printer. If the printer is connected via usb to a machine that moves on and off the network chances are Homegroup sharing of the printer will only work intermittently.
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Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37050427
The printer is connected by usb to the desktop which stays connected to the network and on all the time.  I agree with you that using the ethernet port of the printer is the best solution, but I am trying to learn why W7 networking is giving me problems and what is the most stable way to set it up.

Thanks,
gsgi
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Expert Comment

by:archerslo
ID: 37050706
So does the sharing work properly when logged in as admin on both computers?
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LVL 13

Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37051180
No, it still does not work even then.

-gsgi
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Expert Comment

by:archerslo
ID: 37051491
I'm a little thrown off by your subject line versus the first couple of lines of your post. Are you in fact talking about HomeGroup on Windows 7 versus "home networking" on Vista?
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Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37051550
Right, I tried a home group, and it worked once but proved to be unreliable.  I was at another client, and switching the network location from home to work made sharing work.  So I tried that and seemed to get thrown out of the home group sharing thing...  strange?

-gsgi

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Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37051577
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2344523,00.asp#fbid=21qrN3BED6W

SO according to this article home group only works if the network type is set to home - I think at my other client I set it to 'work' and did not have a problem, but maybe I had already "left" the homegroup...  I don't remember it throwing me out of the homegroup.
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Expert Comment

by:archerslo
ID: 37051628
To be clear, I haven't employed the HomeGroup feature before. But I would suspect that if you set up printer sharing via the conventional Windows share method, then it would be shared independently of the HomeGroup feature. What I'm trying to suggest is that maybe the printer was previously shared "conventionally" and was therefore not affected by changing the setting from "home" to "work." That said, you're certain that the client in the "work" mode is utilizing HomeGroup and not just regular shares?

I would definitely make sure that the computers in question are set to "home." If that doesn't get you there, then I would use the  "Leave the homegroup..." option on each PC, then start over with creating a new homegroup on one and joining it on the other(s). The user account names/passwords should be irrelevant. Of course, it's the homegroup password that really matters.

At any rate, with 12 years of Windows networking experience, I'm curious why you'd suddenly want Microsoft to effectively dumb it all down for you? ;)
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Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37051662
Just sort of curious of the new "easier networking setups" in W7 work reliably.  For me, they have not proven trustworthy, but to be fair, I have not spent a lot of time trying to get it to work nor have I read much about it.  Just pointing and clicking.  So far, the conventional way seems better, but that is quite possibly because I've been doing it that way for a long time now.

-gsgi
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Assisted Solution

by:skarai
skarai earned 800 total points
ID: 37057896
The homegroup concept has advantages especially for less technically inclined people (yes they do exist)  Apple just added a similar feature in itunes to allow media sharing which the homegroup concept also does nicely. Homegroup printer sharing can get a bit confusing - especially if you pair it with physical networking. Let's say you connect the printer directly to the network and share it via homegroup as well - meaning every connected desktop has it available as printer and shares it as well - suddenly you'll see all the shared home network printers as well as the printer which you may have installed as well.  Understanding all aspects of networking and resource sharing - be it traditional sharing or homegroup sharing is the essence of making your network work with and for you easily.
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Accepted Solution

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kpmartin earned 1200 total points
ID: 37060673
I've never had any luck with the HomeGroup concept (Seemed like a good idea) and it drove me nuts for a long time.  You appear to be familiar with the "old" workgroup sharing and that does indeed work a lot better.  So the upshot is to disable the HomeGroup by stopping these two services: HomeGroup Listener and HomeGroup Provider.  Give it a shot!  kevin
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Author Closing Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37086920
Thanks.  gsgi
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Expert Comment

by:archerslo
ID: 37087001
So I guess it could be inferred that you chose to rely on your "15 years of Windows networking experience" and to forgo having "Microsoft effectively dumb it all down for you."
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Author Comment

by:gsgi
ID: 37087893
yes.  the feeling I am getting after doing some more reading is that the old way still works perfectly fine and there is not much of a learning curve for me.  I really do not like new things that work until I leave or have other bizarre restrictions, specifically that setting the network type to "work" kicked me out of the home sharing function.
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