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How to get DCHP entry into DNS

Posted on 2011-10-29
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I have a non-Windows DHCP client whose hostname is showing up in the DHCP lease list, but is not showing up in the DNS list. How do I fix that? Our SBS 2008 server is both the DHCP server and the DNS server. The DHCP settings are shown in the attached image. I do have "Always dynamically update DNS A and PTR records" set. Why is this not working?
DHCPoptions.jpg
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Question by:jmarkfoley
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by:Rob Williams
ID: 37050506
You should set up DNS scavenging and DHCP as per Susan's blog:
http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2010/08/12/setting-dns-scavenging-in-sbs-2003-and-sbs-2008.aspx
If still having problems chack the NIC of the problematic device under advanced DNS properties and make sure register in DNS is not un-checked.
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by:Scott Gorcester
ID: 37050649
You can simply manually add a new host in your DNS
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by:Papertrip
ID: 37050773
Which OS is the non-Windows client running?
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by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37051652
RobWill: I'll check that out right now.

moosesupport:Yes, I know, and I've done that before, but this objective is to NOT hand-assign IPs and hand-enter things into DNS. I want this host, other future hosts like it, and the Windows workstations to use DHCP *and* get into the DNS automatically.

Papertrip: Linux, but I may be adding Apple soon too. I figure if it works for Linux it will work for other *nix'es, including Apple.
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aoakeley earned 2000 total points
ID: 37051666
have you got the credentials set so that DHCP can talk to DNS?
- advanced tab, credentials button
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by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37051702
RobWill: OK, I followed the instructions in that blog-link and it didn't help. You wrote:

> If still having problems chack the NIC of the problematic device under advanced DNS properties and make sure register in DNS is not un-checked.

I do not see any settings for NIC under the advances DNS properties can you guide me to this?

To All: this is my 2nd repost on this subject. In the past, I have had well intentioned and generally high caliber responses, but not from anyone who has actually, successfully, gotten a linux host obtaining its IP address from an SBS 2008 DHCP server to have its hostname visible in the SBS DNS server. While I appreciate educated guesses, I think this problem requires response from someone who has successfully accomplished this task in the past. If no one has the silver bullet, I will have to finally conclude that Windows SBS server is incapable of this DNS function and I will either use some other host on the system for DNS/DHCP, or just do as moosesupport and numerous other have advised and just create a static IP. I will be happy to post screen shots of any DHCP or DNS config screen.

Thanks for your help
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by:Papertrip
ID: 37051706
If you are running CentOS or Red Hat, try the following.

add DHCP_HOSTNAME option to your ifcfg file.  If the interface is eth0, then:
echo "DHCP_HOSTNAME=yourhostname" >> /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
service network restart

Open in new window


I'm not sure if that will do the trick, but it is a quick and easy thing to test.

Make sure you have console access in case your network doesn't come back up.
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by:Papertrip
ID: 37051948
After reading through your previous question about this, I am curious about 1 thing -- did you use the short hostname or FQDN for the DHCP_HOSTNAME setting?  If the latter, change it just the short hostname and give that a shot.
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by:Rob Williams
ID: 37053138
Hi jmarkfoley. I appreciate your comments about someone with experience, and you are quite right. But, to get better assistance it would be good to mention in your question, the problematic PC is Linux based. Non-Windows, which I have to admit I missed, could be anything from a printer, to smart phone, to a MAC, which SBS admins are more accustomed to addressing. I would also recommend asking the moderators to add this to the Linux topic area. Though there is nothing wrong with it, I am very doubtful there are many SBS domains with Linux clients since they cannot take advantage of most of the SBS features. DHCP for server std is the same as SBS and would be a more common scenario, so again adding to the Server Std TA’s may be helpful.

However to add: The 2 key configuration options in Window DHCP that will likely help with the Linux client are
1) “dynamically update DNS A and PTR records that do not request updates” as you show selected in your first post
2)  Under properties for the local domain, under Forward lookup zones in the DNS management console, try changing Dynamic updates from the default “secure only” to “non-secure and secure”

I will bow out at this point but continue to monitor as I am interested in the solution.
Cheers!
--Rob
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by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37068105
Papertrip: I am running slackware.

> did you use the short hostname or FQDN for the DHCP_HOSTNAME setting?

I used the FQDN, but also tried the short hostname (which is how it is set right now). It didn't help.

RobWIll: I did have this posted in the Linux zone with over 30 comments posted. See:  http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Linux_Networking/Q_27345077.html?cid=1575#a36947180

Everyone in that zone was stumped. The Linux side looked good to them and it appeared to be an issue with SBS. The moderator suggested I repost since there were no more zones to post. I'll look into the Std TA zone. Not sure what that is.
> I am very doubtful there are many SBS domains with Linux clients since they cannot take advantage of most of the SBS features.

Not sure what SBS features you mean here. Linux allegedly can participate in Active Directory, mail serving, disk sharing, etc. I know there are lots of SBS domains with Linux (and MAC) clients, but I suppose people generally resort to static IPs.  

>Under properties for the local domain, under Forward lookup zones in the DNS management console, try changing Dynamic updates from the default “secure only” to “non-secure and secure”

Yup. I've got that set too!

The fact is, I think there must be something going on on the SBS server side. Linux appears to be doing its part by sending a host/domain name. The DHCP server *does* have the IP and hostname (see image). So why won't it simply update the A and PTR records in DNS as the DHCP properties are set to do?

I'll give oaakeley's suggestion a shot, then get back to y'all.

newDHCPleases.jpg
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by:Rob Williams
ID: 37069337
I said I would bow out, but there is an implied question directed to me :-)

>>"Std TA zone. Not sure what that is."
I was just referring to Server 2003 and Server 2008 (standard) zones"
I was suggesting you increase your odds of a qualified response by adding to the server 2003/2008 TA's since AD, DNS, and DHCP are pretty much identical between SBS and Server std, except SBS automatically adds a few things like scope options, and there are far more "experts" in those TA's.  

>>"I am very doubtful there are many SBS domains with Linux clients since they cannot take advantage of most of the SBS featAbsolutelysolutly no reason you cannot have a Linux server in an SBS domain, I agree.  
SBS tends to be used by people who want zero configuration. Those are the features to which I was referring that Linux cannot take advantage of as they rely on group policy. In my experience Linux users tend to be more hands on and seem to choose server standard. My point is Linux in an SBS domain is very rare, but  again, not saying it will not work.

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by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37072521
aoakeley: OMG!!!! That worked!!! I found the credential thing in the  IPv4 part of the DHCP console(which has to be expanded before you can see Properties). In the Advanced tab, there is a Credentials button (see image). I added the domain administrator's credentials and Voila!, it worked!!! The host name of the DHCP client Linux machine shows up in DNS and other computer in the domain can now see it! Unbelievable.

Not to start any wars, but this is an incredible procedure to have to go through for something that is straightforward, even automatic, on other systems; and one that has stumped the experts for months. Often, there are serveral places to go in SBS to set up one thing. In this case,  aoakeley's DHCP Credential pane, the DHCP scope properties shown in my initial post, and the DNS Dynamic updates  “non-secure and secure” setting mentioned by RobWill. And none of them say "btw, this setting won't do jack unless you change these other two settings." Plus, needing credentials for DHCP to be able to update DNS seems absurd. It works now, so I'll stop there. aoakeley, thanks a bunch. I wish I could give you 1000 points!

RobWill: Thanks for your thoughtful responses. You are right, Linux doesn't have the Group Policy thing. When you say, "SBS tends to be used by people who want zero configuration," whoa! I'd love for SBS to have zero configuration. This is the most configuration intensive OS I've ever worked on and I've worked on over a dozen including CMS, VMS, GCOS6, CP/M, Mac , various *nix'es... etc. Things just seem to go nutz. Right now, I have a user who suddenly cannot change his password. I didn't do nuthin', honest. Undoubtedly a G.P. issues (see http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Server/SBS_Small_Business_Server/Q_27417311.html if you want to take a shot at it). We have both SBS and Std Servers (I get what you mean now) in our LAN/Domain. This setup pre-dates my involvement, so I'm not sure what the feature-by-feature differences (or limitations) are. Anyway ... thanks feedback.

I'll leave this question open until the end of the day in case anyone has any last comments. Thanks.


DHCP--credentials.jpg
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by:Rob Williams
ID: 37072786
Interesting if the credentials were not supplied prior to this, which they usually are during set up, there should have been notifications in both the event viewer and the daily reports that DHCP needed credentials, regardless of your problem. I have seen many logs with the warning present, and it's easy to 'fix', assuming you get notified. It's as if it looses the cred's sometimes.
Glad to hear you have it working.

As for SBS being complicated, I suspect, quite seriously, that you know too much. The people that have the most problem with SBS are techs that are VERY qualified with standard servers. With SBS they fail to use some of the wizards which absolutely critical, and do things manually as they always have. I am quite certain I can speak for all the frequent SBS posters here that they basically destroyed their first SBS because they didn't use the wizards.

By Zero configure I mean.....in a standard SBS 2008/2011 install you can run the install, answer the questions, run the connect to the Internet wizard, followed by the configure my internet address wizard, go to a PC and join the domain from a browser with http://connect, log on as a user, open Outlook, enter your name, Outlook will self configure and you can start sending and receiving e-mail. At the same time your my documents, desktop and favorites will be redirected to the server, your home page set to access Sharepoint, important links added to your favorites, network and firewall all configured and much more. That is what I call Zero configuration. :-)
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by:aoakeley
ID: 37073916
Rob is correct. There would have been warning in the event log that these were not set.

Glad it worked out for you. I was watching the thread and wondering to myself when you were going to get around to trying my sugestion :)
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by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37088282
RobWill: Point taken about the "Zero config". In fact, I knew nothing about SBS before this machine, but you're right, "the people that have the most problem with SBS are techs that are VERY qualified with standard servers." Before I got this job the company tossed out a team very used to doing servers for large company *not* using SBS. They completely messed up the office for a week. I did bring in an SBS guy, but SBS 2003 experience only and he mistakenly bypassed the profile exporting and we had our own nightmare. I didn't initially set up DHCP, so I don't know if the fellow used a wizard or not. Probably not. I've never seen any warnings. Still, one does have to setup DHCP, DNS, certificates, mail aliases, and lots of little things *after* initial setup, and I still think it's all relatively complicated.

Anyway, thanks for the feedback, and the solution.
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Author Closing Comment

by:jmarkfoley
ID: 37088288
Thanks to all. I'd like to distribute points all around, but aoakeley's solution ended a several month quest and I'l like to give him *more* that 500 'twere it possible.
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by:aoakeley
ID: 37089112
:)
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