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ASP.Net for accomplished Classic ASP front-end developer

Long story short... I was the lead developer for a customer facing web company.  Coding in mostly Classic ASP, HTML, JavaScript, XML, and XSLT.  I've done some bug fixing/enhancing of various .Net projects (various languages) that other people built, but nothing from start to finish.  

I'm looking to be able to demonstrate some .Net acumen in job interviews.  I have no preference for C#, C++, ASP.Net or whatever other .Nets there may be.

I need everything from which version of Visual Studio I can download (for free) to use to a sampling of websites that offer tutorials / starter projects that I can work on in my spare time to get "up to speed".  A primer on the vocabulary used in OO and .Net specifically would also be good (like, being able to provide a definition for "method", or what "overload" means and when to overload versus (whatever the alternative is), and what is actually different between the various Frameworks.

Random thoughts for starter project:
1- Web service that pulls in RSS feeds
2- Web site that consumes the web service from #1 to display content
3- Web service that mimics pulling data from a database (later, expand this to actually installing the database and updating the service to query it)
4- Displaying results of #3 on my website.

Thanks a ton everyone!
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nap0leon
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nap0leon
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
I have no preference for C#, C++, ASP.Net or whatever other .Nets there may be.
You also have VB.NET available to you. ASP.NET isn't really a language; rather it is the technology of creating web sites/pages using .NET. You are free to use either C# or VB.NET to create such pages--I'm not sure about C++.NET for this purpose.

which version of Visual Studio I can download (for free)
There are the "express" versions which allow you to try VS for free. You are even free to develop full production applications using them. The difference between "express" and "professional" editions are the features that come installed. You also might not have some of the project templates available to you (WCF is one that I think is lacking in Express, but I'm not 100% on that). See:  http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/visual-web-developer-express

sampling of websites that offer tutorials / starter projects
This would be an excellent place to start:  http://learn.iis.net/

A primer on the vocabulary used in OO and .Net specifically would also be good (like, being able to provide a definition for "method", or what "overload" means and when to overload versus
TMK, there isn't really anything special regarding OO added into .NET. You should be good reading a standard OO tutorial. I will tell you that a method is just a function, but it is one that is associated with a class rather than just being this thing that exists on its own. In other words, you can't call the function without using the class in some way. "Overload" just means two functions with the same name, but different signatures. Again, any standard OO tutorial will grant you this information.

what is actually different between the various Frameworks.
1.0 & 1.1  -  The first iterations of the Framework. I don't know much about these as I never used them. Occasionally you still find projects written in these. My understanding is that 1.x was a pain in the butt most of the time.

2.0   -  A complete rewrite of the .NET Framework. This version serves as the base for all other Frameworks (meaning everthing else is basically an add-on, not including 1.x). This version gave us Generics, anonymous methods, partial classes, and some other useful classes (it's been a while since I had to think about it, so I think I'm missing a few).

3.0  -  Added Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), Windows Workflow (WF), and Windows Cardspace (WCS).

3.5  -  Added Linq. Enhanced WCF, WF, and WCS.

4.0  -  Added new API classes for Parallel programming. You could still do multi-threaded applications in .net 2.0+, but it's at a more lower level. I believe you could also multi-thread in 1.x, but don't quote me.
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
This would be an excellent place to start:  http://learn.iis.net/
Sorry, wrong link. Although at some point you may need the previously mentioned one, this better fits this conversation: http://www.asp.net/
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nap0leonAuthor Commented:
Ignorance.
If C++ is not a .Net language, then it should be removed (or replaced with some other .Net language)
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nap0leonAuthor Commented:
Thanks kaufmed, that looks like a great start.
Once I get a dev environment set up locally, I'm sure I'll have more questions. ;o)
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