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Kenzii
Kenzii asked
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i have just setup a 2003 server as the host
On a seperate hard drive i have setup a VM machine that is also 2003. Resources we have 3GB (2GB Guest 1GB Host) - Processor is a XEON 2.7ghz P4

The VM is running exchange 2003, file server, DHCP,DNS for a small business (4users) and the majority of the time we dont even use the file server aspect.

The slowness seems awful when RDP'ing directly into the VM machine.

We are using VM Workstation - i can only think that this was not designed for this type of thing.. Should i be learning/using ESXI? The VM resources should really be fine for what it needs but it seems extremely slow?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
You are using VMware Workstation?

VMware Workstation is a Type 2 Hypervisor, other Type 2 Hypervisors include, VMware Server 2, VMware Player 3.0, Virtualbox 4.0, and Parallels.

Type 2 Hypervisors are SLOW.  In most reviews and experience, they perform at roughly 30-40% hardware capability.  That means an OS in a VM run off VMWare Workstation will likely perform at best like it has an 800 MHz CPU if you have 2 GHz physical CPU. You install Type 2 hypervisors onto of an existing host operating system.

If you use a Type 1 Hypervisor, you get MUCH better performance. ESX, ESXi, are all Type 1 hypervisors - they (based on experience and reviews) typically get 80-90% hardware capability - so that same VM run off the same 2 GHz CPU should operate more like it has a 1.6 GHz CPU instead of 800 Mhz. Type 1 hypervisors are installed on the bare metal of the server.

Type 1 Hypervisors also include Hyper-V.

You would be better, replacing the 2003 OS with VMware ESXi for FREE as the Bare Metal OS Hypervisor, instead of VMware Workstation, if this is for business production use.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
Download VMware Hypervisor (ESXi) for free here

http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere-hypervisor/overview.html

and yes, you would be better learning and using the Industry Standard Hypervisor.

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the reply. Just to confirm:

If i was to install a Type 1 hypervisior I would then be able to link my current VM files through? I need to get looking into this..
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VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
Use my video guides, to Backup and Restore you VMs to ESXi.

New HD Video: Restore a Virtual Machine using the FREE VMware vCenter Converter to VMware vSphere 4.x, 5.0 ESXi 4.x, ESXi 5.0, ESX 4.0
http://andysworld.org.uk/2011/10/29/new-hd-video-restore-a-virtual-machine-using-the-free-vmware-vcenter-converter-to-vmware-vsphere-4x-50-esxi-4x-esxi-50-esx-40/

New HD Video: Backup VMware vSphere 4.x, 5.0 ESXi 4.x, ESXi 5.0, ESX 4.0 for FREE using VMware vCenter Converter
http://andysworld.org.uk/2011/10/29/new-hd-video-backup-vmware-vsphere-4x-50-esxi-4x-esxi-50-esx-40-for-free-using-vmware-vcenter-converter/

Yes you would, be able to use them.

Author

Commented:
Thanks very much. Quick and precise answers.
larry urbanDevOps Engineer

Commented:
Hi Knezii,

ESXi is a great alternative because it uses only 32 MB of your ram and almost nothing of your CPU. So the overhead is much less, but the bigger issue on that option is the hardware compatibility. newer versions of ESXi don't support any other hardware than blade servers. Older versions of ESXi like 3.0, supported down to workstation class hardware. Just FYI.

On the other-hand, using what you have currently set up...is the NIC on the VM setup as a NAT? that might be the cause of the slowdown. If it is, change it to "Bridged" so your traffic is sent directly to the VM OS.

Author

Commented:
Todar,
The network card is Bridged. I did actually read about that on the VMware forums and checked it first of all.
Thanks for the reply though :)

I will have to look into ESXi.

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