We help IT Professionals succeed at work.

hdd bigger, save time more?

25112
25112 asked
on

i read in one of the other post of an expert's experience with camera and SD cards that bigger the memory stick (equivalent of HDD in PC), slower the time of operation..
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Digital_Living/Hardware/Cameras_Camcorders/Q_27427130.html#37069743

 is that true in PC.. saving time for a word document in a 750 GB HDD will be greater than a 40GB HDD?


Comment
Watch Question

Computer Service Technician
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Commented:
I do not think that the saving time would be different, in fact I think that the saving time will be faster on the new drive due to the fact that the drive will be a faster drive (better technology then the older drive). What will take longer is the scanning of the disk, if you are scanning the drive for bad sectors obviously the larger the drive the longer it will take to scan the drive.
Commented:
SD cards have no moving objects, no readinghead needs to physically get to the spot where the data is. In a harddisk the head needs to move to the part of the disk where data is stored so there is some time lost there. It depends on the type of harddisks, spinning speed and number of heads what time is needed to get the head in the proper position.
Commented:
it all depends on the drive RPM to some extent. Cheap drives with huge capacity often are only 5400RPM and there ate huge drives that are 7200RPM and even 10,000RPM - latter will be faster than former - but will be expensive.

one other aspect you may want to see is the way the read or write is done. is it sequential, random etc etc.
IOmeter is a drive benchmark tool which you can use to benchmark your drive.

It is not true that new drives always use new technology. few high end laptops ships with 5400RPM drives by default, which will definitely cause performance issues.

but for a consumer who does just word read/writes - it shoudnt be an issue, unless the drive is heavily fragmented.
 
Commented:
Couldn't think of the right word but you need to look into 'mechanical latency'. This includes both seek time and rotational latency. The AVERAGE latency could be lower on an older smaller HD then on a larger newer HD just because of rotationspeed difference and the fact that data can be much more wide-spread on a large harddisk, therefore creating more latency when reading this data.
Commented:
Various factors come into play - key to begin with is drive technology - SATA, SAS, IDE, SCSI - rotational speed and memory on board or the interfacing controller. It could be that a 40 GB SATA drive running at 7200 rpm with 16 MB cache can outperform a 750 GB IDE drive running at 4500 rpm with 2 MB cache.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Commented:
I have seen larger cards perform slower when they're purchased at a similar price point.  A 4GB card versus a 16GB card for the same price will generally be faster because the card is made/rated for a higher speed.  Also possible that the larger/cheaper card is made by a different mfr whose line is slower than the "premium".

As for HDD, it's apples and oranges.  The mechanical latency in a 2TB 7200rpm drive will make it slower for large random writes than a <1TB 10K drive.  Or even a 500GB 7200rpm drive in a 2.5" size.

Word files?  Those are so tiny that they're written completely into cache, so it won't matter.  Even if you _could_ measure latency differences...would you really care?  There is zero effect to the user.  You spent more time measuring microseconds than it's worth, even at minimum wage.

I do have some SSDs, from the same mfr and same line.  The larger (256GB) are faster than the smaller (64GB).  There's some scientific reason for it...I don't remember exactly.

In short: generalities and anecdotes are just that.  Not really opinion or observation.
Commented:
Writing files speed has nothing to do with harddrive space/size.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Top Expert 2012
Commented:
Speeds in hard drives depend on the number of platters and heads, and rotational speed.  Larger drives are not inherently slower, but a lot of new drives are green, meaning that they consume less power, and they achieve this by spinning slower.  Slower rotational speed means slower performance.  On the other hand, 10,000rpm Velociraptor drives are considered the highest performance desktop drives, and they are better in both random read/write and sustained throughput.

SSDs that use more expensive synchronous memory are faster than those with asynchronous memory.  Some SSD controllers are better performing than others (the latest SandForce, Intel, and Marvell models, for example).
Commented:
@above...

data needs to be written to 'free space' on the HD. Larger drivers CAN therefore be slower than smaller drivers with the same technical spec as the free space could be more 'wide spread' and seektimes expand and therefore taking more time to write to disk.... But that would be only a concern with long sustained writing as with short writes the cache would fill first making the system believe the write has been done.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Distinguished Expert 2019
Commented:
it depends on the disk and disk controller capability in which mode it operates also
there are 6 DMA modes + PIO mode (slowest)   http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/modesUDMA-c.html

these define the transfer speed

i assume the 40 GB drive will work in DMA 4, while the 750 will work in DMA 6
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Top Expert 2012
Commented:
>as the free space could be more 'wide spread' and seektimes expand and therefore taking more time to write to disk

Platters are the same size everywhere, and the heads move at about the same speed - a 2TB drive does NOT inherently take more time for the heads to move to random locations than smaller drives - that's what the spec called "average seek time" describes, and it doesn't vary that much for modern drives.

That being said, modern drives start at around 80GB, so a 40GB drive would likely be from an earlier generation, and slower.
Commented:
As stated at http://www.datarecoverylink.com/understanding-platter-sizes/:

The size of the platters is the key factor in determining the hard drives actual physical dimensions. Since most drives are manufactured for use inside a PC they are produced in a number of standard sizes. These standards are called had disk form factors and primarily refer to the drives outside dimensions. Often disks are referred to by a size measurement; i.e. a 3.5 hard disk. When these terms are used it typically refers to the disk's form factor, and usually, the form factor is based upon the platter size. As a general rule, the platter size of the disk is the same for all drives of a given form factor. This is not always true though, especially with the newest drives. Every platter in any specific hard disk has the same diameter.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Commented:
But irrelevant with files the size of a Word document.  And when the condition of the OS, speed of CPU, amount of RAM, video card, competing services/apps, etc...all have more effect on opening/closing these files than the actual hard drive seek and transfer times.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Top Expert 2012
Commented:
If we are talking about a desktop PC, the hard drive form factor will be the same - the article is referring to smaller laptop drives, which are not really being discussed here and don't really perform much different.  You might think smaller hard drives would have faster seek times, but there is a tradeoff of energy used to move the heads, so they don't really outperform desktop drives.
Commented:
The article is referring to drives of the same form factor

[q]As a general rule, the platter size of the disk is the same for all drives of a given form factor. This is not always true though, especially with the newest drives[/q]

But, to end this meaningless info I'm giving ;-), as stated the size of the disk isn't relevant when just working with some office files. If the drives are having the same technical specs and just differ in size there wouldn't be any noticable gain. Rotationspeed or using SSD does make a change but still only just relevant when dealing with such small files.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
Agreed.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Distinguished Expert 2019

Commented:
25112 - any feedback, before the experts start disassembling drives?

Author

Commented:
i am happy with the knowledge on the subject you have shared! thanks all.
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Distinguished Expert 2019

Commented:
ok - see you later..

Explore More ContentExplore courses, solutions, and other research materials related to this topic.