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Shorten the mapped drive for the application

I map the drive say Z.  However, the software does not know about Z so we have to type the entire UNC path.
Is there a way to shorten that?
Thanks.
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depends on what application we're talking about and how does it access the drive/path?
BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015
Commented:
Directly share the folder with the application, and make the share name short so that the UNC Path gets shorter.

Author

Commented:
Custom proprietary application.  It does not know Z, so I need to put \\servername\directory\etc\etc...


BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015
Commented:
As I mentioned, share the last \etc folder as etc. Then your UNC will be \\servername\etc.

Author

Commented:
so i neen to make a shorter path for that.  I cannot bypass other folders.
BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015
Commented:
You are practically bypassing the other folders by creating a new share.

Author

Commented:
I see.  any other way to do it without changing the file structure?
BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015
Commented:
You aren't changing the file structure. You are just adding a further share to the share you already have.
Commented:
On the server where the application is, the path is something like this: D:\Applications\Vendor\AppName\something\bin
When you access the application over the network, it is via the UNC \\server\Applications\Vendor\AppName\something\bin
The server is \\server
The share point or shared folder is \Applications
all the other folders are subfolders
What you can do is create a new share on the server and share the AppName folder so the UNC would be something like \\server\AppName\something\bin
An easy way to do this is from the server, open Windows Explorer and browse to the folder you want to share. Right-click on the folder and click Properties then click the Sharing tab. You can then share this folder so you can access it directly rather than as a sub-folder. You won't have to change the actual folder structure on the server, you are just creating a shortcut to the sub-folder.

Hope this helps.

Author

Commented:
so create a separate mapping?  or add another path to the existing share?
BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015

Commented:
No, Add a new share. You can leave the old share. There is no problem having multiple shares on a server. You probably also don't need a separate mapping as the application can't access mapped drives anyway.
Commented:
You will be creating a new share. Right now, the D:\Applications folder is shared. You will be creating a new share for D:\Applications\Vendor\AppName (using my previous examples). So if you browse to the server in Windows Explorer (type in the path of \\Server), you will see shares for Applications as well as AppName. When you access the application, you would be using the new share.

Hope this helps.

Author

Commented:
New share to the existing Z mapping? How?
Commented:
Forget about the Z mapping. It doesn't matter since the application can't use it. You need to login to the server that is hosting this application (either on the console or via RDP). Open up Windows Explorer and find the folder where the application is. Right-click on that folder and click Properties, then click the Sharing tab. On that tab, there is a box you can click to share that folder (depending on your settings, you may have to click Advanced Sharing to get the option to create the share). When you create the share, at some point, you should see a button that allows you to modify the permissions. Give Everyone Full Control. This will make sure everyone can access the program and won't have any problems. Don't worry, you aren't actually giving everyone full-control of the folder since the underlying NTFS permissions still apply.
After you create the share, you can now access the folder by a shorter UNC (\\Server\AppName instead of \\Server\Applications\Vendor\AppName).

Hope this helps.
BRONZE EXPERT
Most Valuable Expert 2015

Commented:
You don't have to map anything. Just create a share on the server for the last \etc folder where you need the app to access the file. Then in the app use the UNC of this new share, like this \\servername\etc.

Author

Commented:
Got it!!  Sorry no coffee this morning.  Let me try that and let you know.

Author

Commented:
Umm looks like that data share is the level we usually need.  Under that are all the project folders, so you need different folders underneath data for each project.
Commented:
That's fine, you can keep your existing shares for your existing needs and you can create this new share that you want to use for this application. You can create a different share for every single folder on the server if you wanted to. You can even create multiple shares for a single folder (not many useful reasons to do that though).

You aren't getting rid of any functionality or access, you are just adding another way of getting to the sub-folder for the application you want. It's kind of like a shortcut.

Hope this helps.

Author

Commented:
Okay so even if I share the last folder, say \etc and put this into the app \\servername\etc.  It will still see the follders underneath and use data from that structure level.  Correct?
Commented:
Yes, if you access the etc folder via the UNC \\servername\etc, you will be able to access everything under the \etc folder. It will be treated like \etc is the root folder instead of \directory\etc\etc.

For instance, if you have this directory structure:
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir1
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir1\subdir5
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir1\subdir6
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir2
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir3
\\server\directory\appname\etc\subdir4

and you create a share to the etc folder and now access the folder via the UNC \\server\etc, you will see this directory structure:

\\server\etc\subdir1
\\server\etc\subdir1\subdir5
\\server\etc\subdir1\subdir6
\\server\etc\subdir2
\\server\etc\subdir3
\\server\etc\subdir4

Keep in mind that you will still have the old directory structure as well, you are just adding an alternate method of accessing the etc folder.

Hope this helps.

Author

Commented:
Make sense now.  The only thing is we have like 80 directories to update...