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Migrate server 2003 to new non-identical hardware

My Server of 6 years motherbaord died.  I have a new system in place.  What I would like to do is just to hot swap the primary drive from the old server to the new one.  I did this but during boot up it freezes at 'apcitabl' file upload in Safe mode booting.  This is understandable since this old drive is in a new hardware environment.  

What I do not want to do is recreate all the shares, volumes and security descriptors on a blank server 2003 install.  Is there a list or website that describes how to maunually install hardware drivers properly into correct directories in server 2003 and alter the appropriate ini files and/or registry to migrate server 2003 to new unique hardware?  

I looked at the microsoft server migration tool but it assumes functioning servers to migrate to and from.  It does not seem to recognize a server 2003 primary drive alone as a migratable server.

Please help :-)
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Sajid Shaik MSystem Admin
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Commented:
here is the article...

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/249694

all the best

How to move a Windows installation to different hardware

View products that this article applies to.

This article was previously published under Q249694



On This Page

INTRODUCTIONWindows Server 2003 and Windows XP
Windows Server 2008 and Windows VistaPossible recovery scenarios


MORE INFORMATIONHardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
Operating system version
Filter drivers
Windows folder and disk layout
Hardware
Hotfix and service pack level
Moving a Windows client or member server installationFor Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008For Windows Vista
For Windows Server 2008

For Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000

Moving a Windows domain controller installationFor Windows Server 2008
For Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, Windows 2000

Troubleshooting


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INTRODUCTION
Over the life cycle of a Microsoft Windows operating system, you may have to res...

Over the life cycle of a Microsoft Windows operating system, you may have to restore a system state backup that is installed on one computer to the same physical computer or even to a different physical computer. Recovery from the following events may require a restore operation: hardware failure
software failure
computer theft
natural disaster
user error
You can restore a system state backup from one physical computer to the same physical computer or another computer that has the same make, model, and configuration (identical hardware).

Microsoft does not support restoring a system state backup from one computer to a second computer of a different make, model, or hardware configuration. Microsoft will only provide commercially reasonable efforts to support this process. Even if the source and destination computers seem to be identical makes and models, there may be driver, hardware, or firmware differences between the source and destination computers.

This article describes how to create a system state backup on one computer and restore it to the same computer or to a different physical computer of the same make and model. If you do not follow the steps in this article, you will reduce the probability of success when you restore to different hardware.
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Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
To restore Windows Server 2003-based computers and Windows XP-based computers, the preferred method of recovery is to use the Automated System Recovery (ASR) feature. ASR automates the whole restore process. This process produces the most reliable result.

The source computer is defined as the computer that you used to create the system state backup. The destination computer is the computer where you will restore the backup.
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Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista
To restore Windows Server 2008-based computers and Windows Vista-based computers, the preferred method is a full system restore. Specifically, without using ASR, you can perform a Bare Metal Restore (BMR) to freshly formatted boot volumes and system volumes on same server that the original backup was taken from. In this case, the volumes layouts and identifiers are identical to those used during the backup of the original computer. Additionally, you can perform a BMR that uses ASR to a computer that has different hardware to the original computer.

Note BMRs may be performed only when the system is offline.


Possible recovery scenarios
Server unbootable/Server-migration scenario (planned and unplanned)

In this scenario, you can protect the server by performing BMR backup of all critical volumes on the server. You would then recover server by performing a BMR recover through Windows Recovery. In this scenario, BMR is supported to different hardware.
Server malfunction scenario (bootable) or roll back of server roles

In this scenario, you can protect the server by performing a System State Backup or by performing a BMR backup. You would then recover the server by performing a System State Recovery from the started operating system.
System State Recovery after a new installation of Windows Server 2008 on new hardware or same hardware
This kind of recovery is not supported.

Windows Server Backup does not block recovery on a newly-installed operating system. Instead, it warns that this operation is not supported. This feature is used only as a last-ditch support effort to reclaim data from a failed server and is not a supported backup feature

System State Recover is only supported on the same operating system instance. It is not supported on a reinstalled operating system on the same or different hardware.
The following table outlines supported and unsupported system recovery scenarios.

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Scenario

Supported



System State Recovery to the same instance of Windows Server 2008

Yes



System State Recovery after BMR / Full Server restore to the same hardware

Yes



System State Recovery after BMR / Full Server restore to different hardware

No



System State Recovery after Full Server restore (without BMR) to the same or different hardware

No



System State Recovery after a new installation of Windows Server 2008 on new hardware or same hardware

No


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MORE INFORMATION
The following guidelines must be followed for the restore operation to succeed....

The following guidelines must be followed for the restore operation to succeed.
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Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
The source and destination computers must use the same type of HAL. There is one exception to this rule. If one of the computers contains the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) multiprocessor HAL, the other computer can have the ACPI uniprocessor HAL. The same rule applies to MPS multiprocessor and MPS uniprocessor HALs.

For example, if the source is using the MPS multiprocessor HAL, you can restore data to a destination computer that uses the MPS uniprocessor HAL. However, you cannot restore data to a destination computer that uses the ACPI multiprocessor HAL.

Note If the destination computer's HAL is compatible, but not identical, to the source computer's HAL, you must update the HAL on the destination computer after you finish the restore. For example, if the source computer has a single processor and is using the ACPI uniprocessor HAL, you can restore a backup from that computer to a multiprocessor destination computer. However, the destination computer will not use more than one processor until you update the HAL to an ACPI multiprocessor HAL.

To determine the computer HAL type that you are using on each computer, follow these steps: Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then click System.
On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager, and then expand the Computer branch. ACPI multiprocessor computer = Halmacpi.dll
ACPI uniprocessor computer = Halaacpi.dll
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) computer = Halacpi.dll
MPS multiprocessor computer = Halmps.dll
MPS uniprocessor computer Halapic.dll standard computer = Hal.dll
Compaq SystemPro multiprocessor or 100% compatible = Halsp.dll


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Operating system version
The source and destination computers must use identical operating system versions and identical Windows stock-keeping units (SKUs). For example, you cannot back up Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and then restore it on a computer that is running Windows 2000 Advanced Server. Also, the source and destination computers should both use retail versions of Windows or should both use the same OEM version of Windows. The best practice is to install Windows on the destination computer by using the same installation media that you used to install the source computer.
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Filter drivers
Uninstall third-party filter drivers on the source computer before you perform the backup. These kinds of drivers can cause problems when the backup is restored to a different computer.
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Windows folder and disk layout
The destination computer must use the same logical drive letter (%systemdrive%) and path (%systemroot%) as the source computer. For domain controllers, the locations of the Active Directory directory service database, Active Directory log files, FRS database, and FRS log files must also be identical for the source and destination computers. For example, if the Active Directory database log files on the source computer were installed on C:\WINNT\NTDS, the destination computer must also use the C:\WINNT\NTDS path.
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Hardware
If you remove any hardware on the destination computer that is not required to complete the restore process, you increase the probability of a successful restore operation. For example, physically remove or disable all except one network adapter. Install or enable the additional adapters after you restart the operating system after the restore operation.
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Hotfix and service pack level
For Windows 2000 computers, hotfix 810161 or Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 must be installed on the source computer before you back up data. These items must also be installed on the destination computer before you restore the backup. Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP have no hotfix or service pack level requirements for this kind of restore operation.

A user does not have to bring the destination computer up to the same service pack and hotfix level for Windows Server 2003 or for Windows XP. However, restoring a Windows Server 2003 SP1-based computer requires you to restore the destination computer to Windows Server 2003 SP1. If you do not do this, you will receive the following error message:


Error message when you restore a Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1-based backup on a Windows Server 2003-based computer: Windows could not start because of an error in the software
For more information about the error message that you receive when you restore a Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1-based backup on a Windows Server 2003-based computer, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
914049  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/914049/ ) Error message when you restore a Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1-based backup on a Windows Server 2003-based computer: "Windows could not start because of an error in the software"

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Moving a Windows client or member server installation

For Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008
For client and member server computers, follow these steps to back up the Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 installation and restore it to a different computer.

Note A member server is any server that is not a domain controller.

Note The following requirements must be met to move Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 to a different computer. Hard Disk: Startup hard disk capacity should be larger or same size. Even if it is smaller by a single byte, BMR will be blocked.
BMR supports IDE, SATA, or SCSI hard disks. You can make the backup on one kind of hard disk and recover on another kind of hard disk. For example, IDE to SCSI is supported.
You should make sure that your RAID setup on the destination computer does not interfere with the boot order of the hard disks.

The operating system architecture and processor architecture must match. The three architectures, x86, x64, and IA-64 support the following scenarios: Backup of an x86 operating system version:
This backup can be restored to an x86 processor computer or to an x64 processor computer.
Backup of an x64 operating system version:
This backup can be restored only to an x64 processor computer.
Backup of an IA-64 (Itanium) operating system version:
This backup can be restored only to an IA-64 computer.

Additionally, the architecture of WinRE or the Setup CD should match the architecture of the operating system that is being recovered. For example, you would use an x86 version WinRE CD to restore an x86 operating system on an x86 computer.

You can treat AMD or Intel processors as being the same if they follow the same architecture. The backup of AMD x64 computer's operating system can be recovered on to an Intel x64 computer, or vice a versa. Recovery to Startup disk only:
The recovery process will restore the backup to the first hard disk in the BIOS boot order. You cannot change to another hard disk to restore the operating system.

For Windows Vista
To back up and restore a Windows Vista, follow these steps: On the source computer, log on by using the administrator account, and then stop all noncritical services and services that you typically stop before you perform a backup. This may include any service that puts locks on files. This includes antivirus, disk scanning, and indexing services.
On the source computer, verify that the TCP/IP start value is set to 1. This value is located in the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip


Collapse this tableExpand this table




Value name

Start



Value type

REG_DWORD



Value data

1


On the source computer, create a complete backup of the computer.

Note If you back up the computer to a hard disk, you will have to either move that disk to the destination server, or you will have to share that hard disk over the network if it is possible to do so. Click Start, in the Start Search box, type Backup and Restore Center, and then press ENTER.
Click Backup Computer.
In the Where do you want to save your backup window, click One or more DVDs, and then click Next.
In the Which file types do you want to backup window, click to select all the check boxes, and then click Next.
Click Start backup.

Start the destination computer from the installation disc into the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE). You must use an installation disc that contains Windows Vista Service Pack 1 because the release version of Windows Vista does not support this scenario.
Restore the backup to the destination computer. To restore from a backup DVD, follow these steps: Start the computer from the Windows Vista installation DVD.
Click Repair your computer.
Click Complete PC Restore.
Select the operating system that you want to repair. If you are restoring to a blank hard disk, no operating systems are listed.
Remove the Windows Vista Installation DVD, and then insert the first backup DVD.
Click Windows Complete PC Restore, and then follow the instructions.


To restore from a hard drive, follow these steps: Install the hard disk on the destination computer.
Start the computer from the Windows Vista installation DVD.
Click Repair your computer.
Select the operating system that you want to repair. If you are restoring to a blank hard disk, no operating systems are listed.
Click Windows Complete PC Restore, and then follow the instructions.

Restart the computer, and then verify that it is functioning correctly.

If the restored computer was a member computer of a domain, test the security channel by using the NLTEST command:
NLTEST /SC_QUERY:DomainName
If SC_QUERY reports a failure condition, reset the security channel by using the following command:
NLTEST /SC_RESET:DomainName
If the destination computer is a member computer, you may have to reset its security channel with the domain, depending on how recently the backup occurred. When you run the netdom query trust /verify command, the security channel relationship test will fail if the security channel is broken. For more information about how to use the netdom tool, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772217.aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772217.aspx)
If the trust relationship test fails and indicates a failed security channel, you can run the netdom command on the destination computer to reset the channel. The netdom command is also available in the Support Tools. To reset the security channel, use the following netdom command:
netdom reset Destination computer /domain:domain_name usero:admin_user /passwordo:admin_user_password
Note In this command, Destination computer represents the destination computer, domain_name represents the name of the domain, admin_user represents the user who is a member of the administrator group, and admin_user_password represents the password of the user account.

For Windows Server 2008
To recover a Windows Server 2008 installation, follow the steps in the following Microsoft TechNet article:
Recover the Operating System (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755163(WS.10).aspx)
To recover a Windows Server 2008 R2 installation, follow the steps in the following Microsoft TechNet article:
Recover the Operating System or Full Server (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755163.aspx)
Note For more information about Windows Server Backup, see the following Microsoft TechNet article:
Backing Up Your Server (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753528.aspx)

For Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000
For client and member server computers, follow these steps to back up the Windows installation and restore it to a different computer. (A member server is any server that is not a domain controller.) On the source computer, log on by using the administrator account, and then stop all noncritical services and services that you typically stop before you perform a backup. This may include any service that puts locks on files. This includes antivirus, disk scanning, and indexing services.
On the source computer, verify that the TCP/IP start value is set to 1. This value is located in the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip


Collapse this tableExpand this table




Value Name

Start



Value Type

REG_DWORD



Value Data

1


On the source computer, use Windows Backup to back up the system drive, the system drive subfolders, and the system state.
On the destination computer, perform a new installation of Windows by using the same operating system version as the source computer. Make sure that you install the operating system in the same drive and path that was used on the source computer. For example, if Windows is installed to C:\WINNT on the source, you must install to the same location on the destination computer.
After the new installation is complete, log on to the destination computer as Administrator. By using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any additional volumes that may be required to hold a system state component. Make sure that all drive letters match those of the source computer. Disk space for volumes on the destination computer should be as least as large as corresponding volumes on the source.
On the destination computer, create a C:\Backup folder. Put a copy of the C:\Boot.ini file and the whole %systemroot%\Repair folder, including all of its subfolders, in the C:\Backup folder for use in step 8. The Boot.ini file is in the root of the system partition (typically, C:\Boot.ini). The Repair folder is generally in the C:\WINNT\Repair folder or in the C:\WINDOWS\Repair folder.
To restore the backup on the destination computer, follow these steps: Click Start, click Run, type ntbackup, and then click OK.
On the Tools menu, click Options, click the Restore tab, and then click Always replace the file on my computer.
Restore the system state from the backup that you performed earlier. Make sure that you select the option to restore to the original location.

Note To have access to all removable media (tape or magneto-optical disk) from the source computer after the restore operation is complete, you must click Restore Removable Storage Database under the Advanced button before you start the restore operation.

After the restore operation is complete, but before you restart the destination computer, follow these steps: Copy the Boot.ini file from the c:\Backup folder that you created in step 6. Copy the Repair folder and its subfolders from the C:\Backup folder to the %systemroot%\Repair folder.
Reinstall the destination computer's hard disk controller drivers if third-party drivers are being used.
Verify that the source computer is turned off, disconnected from the network, or has been reinstalled by using a different computer name and IP address. (If the source computer had a static IP address, the destination computer will have that same static IP address after the restore operation.)

Restart the computer, and then verify that it is functioning correctly.

If the restored computer was a member computer or member server, test the security channel by using the NLTEST command:

NLTEST /SC_QUERY:<DomainName>If SC_QUERY reports a failure condition, reset the security channel by using the following command:

NLTEST /SC_RESET:<DomainName>If the destination computer is a member computer or member server, you may have to reset its security channel with the domain, depending on how recently the backup occurred. When you run the netdiag /test:trust command, the security channel relationship test will fail if the security channel is broken. The netdiag command is available when you install the Support Tools on the Windows installation media.

If the trust relationship test fails and indicates a failed security channel, you can run the netdom command on the destination computer to reset the channel. The netdom command is also available in the Support Tools. To reset the security channel, use the following netdom command:
netdom reset Destination computer /domain:domain_name usero:admin_user /passwordo:admin_user_password

Note Destination computer is the destination computer. domain_name is the name of the domain. admin_user is the user who is a member of the administrator group. admin_user_password is the password of the user account.

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Moving a Windows domain controller installation
Warning The following procedure is intended for failure recovery or hardware replacement of a single domain when no other domain controllers are available. If there are other healthy domain controllers online for the domain, we recommend that you do not perform a restore at all. Instead, perform a new installation of Windows on the destination computer and run the Active Directory Installation Wizard (Dcpromo.exe), to make the installation a replica in an existing domain.
For Windows Server 2008
Note The following requirements must be met to move Windows Server 2008 to a different computer. Hard Disk: Startup hard disk capacity should be larger or same size. Even if it is smaller by a single byte, BMR will be blocked.
BMR supports IDE, SATA, or SCSI hard disks. You can make the backup on one kind of hard disk and recover on another kind of hard disk. For example, IDE to SCSI is supported.
You should make sure that your RAID setup on destination computer does not interfere with the boot order of the hard disks.

The operating system architecture and processor architecture must match. The three architectures, x86, x64, and IA-64 support the following scenarios: Backup of an x86 operating system version:
This backup can be restored to an x86 processor computer or to an x64 processor computer.
Backup of an x64 operating system version:
This backup can be restored only to an x64 processor computer.
Backup of an IA-64 (Itanium) operating system version:
This backup can be restored only to an IA-64 computer.

Additionally, the architecture of WinRE or Setup CD should match architecture of the operating system being recovered. For example, you would use an x86 version WinRE CD to restore an x86 operating system on an x86 computer.

You can treat an AMD or Intel processors as being the same, if they follow the same architecture. The backup of AMD x64 computer's operating system can be recovered on to an Intel x64 computer or vice a versa. Recovery to Startup Disk only: The recovery process will restore the backup to the first had disk in the BIOS boot order. You cannot change to another hard disk to restore the operating system.
To back up and restore a Windows Server 2008 domain controller installation, follow the steps in the following TechNet article:
Performing a Full Server Recovery of a Domain Controller (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772519(WS.10).aspx)
For more information about how to use Windows Server Backup, visit the following TechNet article::
Backing up your Server (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753528.aspx)

For Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, Windows 2000
On the source computer, log on by using the administrator account, and then stop all noncritical services and services that you typically stop before you perform a backup. This may include any service that puts locks on files. This includes antivirus, disk scanning, and indexing services.
On the source computer, verify that the TCP/IP start value is set to 1. This value is located in the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip


Collapse this tableExpand this table




Value Name

Start



Value Type

REG_DWORD



Value Data

1


Use the Windows backup tool to back up the system drive and the system state. For Windows 2000, if Sysvol resides on a drive other than the system drive, you must also back up that folder and all subfolders. For example, if Sysvol is located in the D:\Sysvol folder, you must back up the system drive, the system state, and the D:\Sysvol folder.
Perform a new installation of Windows on the destination computer by using the same version of Windows as the source computer. Make sure that you install Windows to the same location as on the source computer. For example, if Windows is installed to the C:\WINNT folder on the source, you must install Windows to the same location on the destination.
After the new installation is complete, log on to the destination computer as an administrator. By using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any additional volumes that may be required to hold a system state component or an application. Make sure that all drive letters match those of the source computer.
On the destination computer, create a C:\Backup folder. Put a copy of the Boot.ini file in that folder, in the %systemroot%\Repair folder, and in all the subfolders of the Repair folder. The Boot.ini file is in the root of the system partition. (This folder is typically the C:\Boot.ini folder.) The Repair folder is typically in the C:\WINNT\Repair folder or in the C:\WINDOWS\Repair folder.

If the source computer is the only domain controller for the domain, reinstall Windows on the source computer, or disconnect it from the network, before you restore the backup to the destination computer. We recommend those steps, because it is too easy for someone to turn the source computer back on. If someone turns on the source computer, name conflicts or other problems with the destination computer occur.

If the source computer is not the only domain controller for the domain, use the Active Directory Installation Wizard to remove Active Directory from the source computer. Then, either reinstall Windows on the source computer, or disconnect it from the network .
When you have confirmed that the source computer and the restored destination computer are not online at the same time, restore the backup by following these steps: Click Start, click Run, type ntbackup, and then click OK.
On the Tools menu, click Options, click the Restore tab, and then click Always replace the file on my computer.
Restore the system state and the system drive from the backup that you performed earlier. For Windows 2000, you must also manually select the Sysvol folder to be restored. The system state includes Sysvol. However, there is an issue in Windows 2000 that prevents the Sysvol junction points from being restored correctly if you restore only the system state. Make sure that you select the option to restore to Original location.

After the restore operation is complete, but before you restart the destination computer, follow these steps: Replace the Boot.ini file and the %systemroot%\Repair folder that has the copies that you made in step 6.
Reinstall the destination computer's hard disk controller drivers if third-party drivers are being used.
In the TCP/IP settings, verify that the computer is configured to use a Domain Name System (DNS) server that is authoritative for the domain and that is currently online. Do not configure the server to use itself for DNS because the DNS records in the backup may no longer be valid. When the restore operation is complete, and when you have verified that the destination computer is functioning correctly, you can configure the server to use itself for DNS.

If the destination computer will be the first or only domain controller for the domain, follow these steps to authoritatively restore the File Replication Service (FRS). This step must also be complete before the first restart after the restore operation is complete.

Warning Do not follow these steps if there are existing domain controllers in the domain. Click Start, and then click Run, type regedit, and then press ENTER.
Locate the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\NtFrs\Parameters\Replica Sets

Expand Replica Sets, identify the subkey that refers to the replica set DOMAIN SYSTEM VOLUME (SYSVOL SHARE).
Then find the subkey of the Cumulative Replica Sets subkey that matches the name of the subkey from the previous step.
Expand Cumulative Replica Sets, click the subkey that represents the Sysvol replica set, double-click BurFlags.
In the Edit DWORD Value dialog box, type D4, and then click OK.
Restart the computer.

Restart the computer and verify that it is functioning correctly by using the dcdiag and netdiag commands. For more information about how to use the dcdiag command, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
265706  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/265706/ ) Dcdiag and netdiag in Windows 2000 facilitate domain join and DC creation
If there are existing domain controllers in the domain, you may have to reset its security channel, depending on how recently the backup occurred. If the security channel is broken, the netdiag /test:trust command will indicate that the trust relationship test failed. If the trust relationship test result indicates that the test was skipped, you can safely ignore the results. This result indicates that the computer that you are running the test on has the PDC emulator operation master role.

If the trust relationship test fails, you have a failed security channel. To fix this, run the netdom command on the destination computer to reset the security channel. To reset the security channel on a domain controller by using the netdom command, follow these steps: Stop the Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) service, and set it to Manual startup.
Run the following command to reset the security channel:
netdom resetpwd /server:replication_partner_server_name /userd:domain_name\admin_user /password:admin_user_password
Note replication_partner_server_name is the name of the replication partner server. The command must be running locally on the destination computer.
Restart the computer, start the KDC, and then set it back to Automatic startup.

Make sure that you verify that replication is working if there are existing domain controllers in the domain. For more information about how to verify replication, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
232072  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/232072/ ) Initiating Replication between Active Directory direct replication partners


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Troubleshooting
After you restart the destination computer, you may experience the following symptoms: You receive one of the following Stop error messages:


Stop 0x0000007B Inaccessible_Boot_Device




STOP: 0x00000079 Hal_Mismatch


The computer stops responding at startup.
The computer that is running Windows Server 2008 crashes on startup. This occurs when the source HAL and the target HAL do not match.
The computer spontaneously restarts when you receive the following message on a black screen early in the restart process:
Starting Windows 2000

You cannot configure your display settings.
The network adapter does not function correctly.
To resolve issues with the display settings or with a network adapter, remove the graphics adapter or the network adapter from Device Manager, and then restart the computer. Windows will redetect the device and possibly prompt you for drivers.

To resolve the problem when the source HAL and the target HAL under Windows Server 2008, follow these steps: Click Start, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator.
Run the following command: bcdedit /set GUID_identifier detecthal yes
To resolve the Stop error or the problem where a computer stops responding, perform an in-place upgrade of Windows.

For more information about how to perform an in-place upgrade, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
292175  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/292175/ ) How to perform an in-place upgrade of Windows 2000

816579  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816579/ ) How to perform an in-place upgrade of Windows Server 2003

315341  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341/ ) How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
After you finish the in-place upgrade, verify that the ClientProtocols registry subkey exists and is correctly populated. To do this, follow these steps: Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
Locate and then right-click the following registry subkey. Verify that the values in the following list exist:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Rpc\ClientProtocols

Collapse this tableExpand this table




Value name

Value type

Value data



ncacn_ip_tcp

REG_SZ

rpcrt4.dll



ncacn_ip_udp

REG_SZ

rpcrt4.dll



ncacn_nb_tcp

REG_SZ

rpcrt4.dll



ncacn_np

REG_SZ

rpcrt4.dll


If the ClientProtocols subkey itself is missing, add it under the Rpc subkey.
If values are missing in the ClientProtocols subkey, follow these steps: Right-click ClientProtocols, point to New, and then click String Value.
Type the value name of the entry that is missing, and then press ENTER.
Right-click the value name that you typed in step b, and then click Modify.
Type the appropriate value data for the value name that you typed in step b, and then click OK.

Repeat step 4 for each missing value in the ClientProtocols subkey.
Restart the computer if any registry changes were made.
Note If the source computer was upgraded from Windows NT 4.0, the user profiles may be stored in the %systemroot%\Profiles folder instead of in the %systemdrive%\Documents and Settings folder. After an in-place upgrade is performed, you may have to change the following registry value back to %systemroot%\Profiles.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

Collapse this tableExpand this table




Value Name

Profiles directory



Value Type

REG_EXPAND_SZ



Value Data

%systemroot%\Profiles

For more information about user profiles, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
214653  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/214653/ ) How to set the path for the All Users profile

228445  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/228445/ ) User profile storage in Windows 2000
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APPLIES TO
Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Edition
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 Enterprise
Windows Server 2008 Standard
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard
Windows Vista Business
Windows Vista Enterprise

Author

Commented:
This is a great resource and is helpful.  Thank You!  This gets me almost half way. I have complete backups of the system and system state for the old server.  In fact I have the original hard drive with all the server system intact.  The problem is that new server hardware is so very different and greatly improved.  No drivers will carry over.

What I need, if it exists, is a road map to manually altering the original servers hard drive to insert the proper new hardware drivers along with altering the HAL and reg entries or if that is crazy a way of importing the active directory, DHCP & WINS data and security despcriptors to the new server over a fresh install of server 2003. Then - Start up the server and let windows figure out the rest.  Note that the old server hardware is gone.  I only have the server's primary drive and backups as sources.

I do not want to try to recreate 6 yrs of active directory & user tweaking on the new machine this weekend from scratch.
IT Product Manager
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Top Expert 2009
Commented:
I would do it with third party tools such as Paragon Drive Backup 10 Server www.drive-backup.com
Its Adjust OS feature adjusts the Windows OS to new dissimilar hardware in few clicks.

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