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Is there any way to find out where these images are stored?

I have been trying to use Firebug to see where these images may be stored. Is there any way to figure that out? I am trying to see if there is a direct link to the images.

http://shop.lego.com/catalog/productLargeView.jsp?modalView=true&productCode=10221&scene7Video=0&scene7Spin=0


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Commented:

Those "images" are SWF files.

Nrisimha

Author

Commented:
yes, i know it is a flash display.  But it still may be calling an external source, that's why I am looking for assistance from Flash gurus or anyone that may know how to figure out where they may be coming from.
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
As near as I can tell they are on cache.lego.com which appears to be secure and there is a re-direct if you try to get there.

Cd&
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
From the way it loads and the time it takes I don't believe it is stored as a single entity.  I think there is a generation process that puts components together as a completed flash object that is then delivered to the browser.  So even if you got to the secure sub-domain you would not find the flash images.


Cd&
You can copy out all the *.SWF files from your browser cache after clicking on each of the thumbnails to show the matching main image, and then extract the JPG images from them using one of a number of "Flash Resource Extractor" programs.  The ones that contain the thumbnail images used in the scrolling bar have 80 x 60 pixel transparent JPG images, and the corresponding files contain a main image JPG 800 x 600.

You can unpack a SWF file like this with 7-Zip to several pretty small files with numeric names and numeric "extensions", and by opening each in a text editor like Notepad you will see which is the image by the JFIF header identifier (JFIF = JPEG/JPG image).  Rename that file to a .JPG and you have the image.  You will find that the extracted file that is the largest in file size is your JPG mage.

The main 800 x 600 images are not fully compliant JPG/JPEG images though.  A standard JPG image doesn't really support transparency. I would have to examine them in detail, but  these are more like PNG or GIF files with black set as the transparent colour.  You can, however, open them in an image editor like the free IrfanView that opens just about any type of image file and resave as a PNG or GIF with the option set to select the colour to preserve as transparent, and they will thereafter open as PNGs or GIFs.

I must point out that I am offering this purely for informational purposes and I am not condoning this type of activity.  The images are the subject of copyright, and by acquiring them for your own use contravenes that copyright and amounts to plagiarism.