Deleting blank rows in MS Excel results in Run Time error 1004


The below code works fine if I have a blank row, but if there is no blank row I get a Run Time 1004 error - "No Cells Were Found".  Any thoughts on to fix this issue

[D.D].SpecialCells(xl.blank).EntireRow.Delete
upobDaPlayaAsked:
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krishnakrkcCommented:
Hi,

On error resume next
[D.D].SpecialCells(xl.blank).EntireRow.Delete
On error goto 0

Kris
0
upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
Does ...On Error goto 0 essentially exit the sub ?
0
krishnakrkcCommented:

From the help file...

On Error Resume Next causes execution to continue with the statement immediately following the statement that caused the run-time error, or with the statement immediately following the most recent call out of the procedure containing the On Error Resume Next statement. This statement allows execution to continue despite a run-time error. You can place the error-handling routine where the error would occur, rather than transferring control to another location within the procedure. An On Error Resume Next statement becomes inactive when another procedure is called, so you should execute an On Error Resume Next statement in each called routine if you want inline error handling within that routine.


  Note
The On Error Resume Next construct may be preferable to On Error GoTo when handling errors generated during access to other objects. Checking Err after each interaction with an object removes ambiguity about which object was accessed by the code. You can be sure which object placed the error code in Err.Number, as well as which object originally generated the error (the object specified in Err.Source).


On Error GoTo 0 disables error handling in the current procedure. It doesn't specify line 0 as the start of the error-handling code, even if the procedure contains a line numbered 0. Without an On Error GoTo 0 statement, an error handler is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

HTH

Kris
0

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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
This response makes me realize how much I appreciate EE
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