Dedicated Storage - iSCSI - Dell Equallogic

I am got this one as a primary storage:
Dedicated Storage - iSCSI - Dell Equallogic PS 6000XV
- Dell Equallogic, HP 6000 series with dual controllers, dedicated
 - HDD: 16 x 300 GB SAS 15krpm
 - Scalable up to a maximum of 57 TB raw
 - Updating including
And getting another one for backups:
Dedicated Storage - iSCSI - Dell Equallogic PS 6100XV
 - Dell Equallogic, HP 6000 series with dual controllers, dedicated
 - HDD: 24 x 600 GB SAS 15krpm
 - The importing of updates is included

Does this make sense?  Looks like a backup my vendors getting is better and larger then the primary enclosure. And also about $1000 more expensive.
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Tiras25Asked:
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kevinhsiehCommented:
I am sorry, what is your question?

The PS6100 is the refresh of the PS6000. The drives went from 16 3.5" drives to 24 2.5" drives. The PS6100 should nominally give you 50% more IOPS and has 3X the capacity. What's not to love about that? I don't see why the pricing is so close, it sounds like your quote is off.  

Is this your first SAN? Have you looked at the PS4100? I just got one to complement my older arrays and it is very fast, and a lot cheaper than the PS6XX0 series. Do you KNOW that you actually need 15K drives? Have you calculated your required IOPS?
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Tiras25Author Commented:
Yes, I am not sure about the pricing also.  Not sure if I need 15K but for the faster backup and recovery why not..
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kevinhsiehCommented:
Well, 15K drives cost more to buy, take more electricity to run, take more electricity to cool, cause more global warming, and don't increase throughput.

How do you plan on using this "backup" system.
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Tiras25Author Commented:
Well, the first primary PS6000XV is also 16x300GB SAS 15krpm.

Backups?  Use Amanda backup system.  SAN snapshots.
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kevinhsiehCommented:
If you are storing actual backups, you should be using a 7.2K NLSAS/SATA system, not a high performance array. We are talking about a very expensive backup target. If you are replicating data so that you can run off your second SAN, then a 10K or 15K system might make sense.
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Tiras25Author Commented:
So even for backup and restore performance.  Slower drive should be okay?  
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kevinhsiehCommented:
Ever heard of DataDomain? All of their systems were using SATA drives. The current offerings might be using a small amount of flash, but the bulk is SATA. If this is a backup target, why not get something like the MD line which costs something like 1/3 the price per GB?
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Tiras25Author Commented:
I think my hosted vendor is Dell EqualLogic shop and we should keep that for the consistency reasons.

What would you recommend for 7.2K NLSAS/SATA 'slower' EqualLogic system?

Thanks.
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andyalderCommented:
Backup files are sequential, you don't need the fast seek speed of 10k or 15k disks.

Can you confirm what you mean by "dedicated" please. If it's to attach to a single server then you'd probably be a lot better off with a good RAID controller and dumb external enclosure.
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Tiras25Author Commented:
Not a backup but just for NAS share RAID-50.  Does not need to be a high performance.  Just to store data.
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andyalderCommented:
Well, an equallogic SAN is a bit expensive if it's just attach to a server to share files with. You still haven't said what the "dedicated" is about but I think someone might be pushing you into buying more than you need. SANs are expensive because thay don't make that many of them, bog standard servers are cheap.

You can squash 16*300GB 10K SFF disks into a 2U server, more into a bigger box, there isn't much advantage of taking those disks out of the server, putting them in a SAN box, and connecting the two together with relatively slow Ethernet unless you want to utilize the bells and whistles that a SAN gives you. You'll have to spend close to $1000 for a really good PCIe RAID controller but that's still a lot less than a SAN.

For example, if you want to run three servers with shared server in a cluster then buy a SAN, if you don't then buy a NAS box or off the shelf wintel server.
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Tiras25Author Commented:
"dedicated' meaning not shared with other customers in the data center.  
Dell can provide 2TB 3.5"-SATA-drives in the 12-bay models and 1TB 2.5"-SATA drives in the 24-bay enclosures, so both will max out at 24TB.
I hit another snag though with my hosting vendor.  THe PS6000 series discontinued and new PS6100 isn't approved yet :-)   funny and sad..
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andyalderCommented:
OH, Dell is hosting it for you in their datacenter, you didn't make that clear; I thought you were buying it. Not dedicated to one server then but shared between your own hosted servers I presume. I'd use SFF SAS for performance on the primary but maybe LFF SATA on the backup/failover if Dell support replication between dissimilar SANs on the grounds that during failover you can tolerate a bit of a slowdown because the primary isn't down for long.

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Tiras25Author Commented:
Not Dell, another hosting vendor that using Dell equipment.  This is just for the storage RAID-50 so doesn't have to be fast.  SATA drives should be OK.  
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