SBS new installation

Hi, I am about to order SBS 2011. The server will be for a small business (<10 employees).

Questions.

1. I would prefer that all data is stored on the server, but I am not entirely sure of the benefits of a home drive. Does this automatically redirect the Desktop and My Documents folder to the server? Any suggestions on benefits of allowing a home drive?

2. Many users have access to their computer through Logmein. Is remote control of desktop computers fully supported in Remote Web Workspace? Is Remote Desktop control of individual computers also supported over VPN, or just the server?

3. I will use Acronis Image backup for SBS 2011. What do you recommend for backup of exchange? Is the built in SBS software backup adequate?

4. Are there mailbox size limits? Some email accounts are approaching 7GB, with Archives of about 2GB. How are archives held within SBS 2011 or must these be held in a local PST file? Are Archives even necessary if we have very large mailbox sizes?

5. Are there any issues with some usernames being the same as computer names? Our reception computer is used by three different employees (one generic email address), so we would like to have the username and computer name called Reception.

Thank you.



OZSJAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
1. SBS includes the ability to redirect desktop and mg documents folders to the server.  This allows a user to log in to any domain joined pc and have access to their files. Home drives can be setup but in general I don't think most people bother with them anymore.

2. Yes, you can easily use the remote web workplace features to connect from anywhere and with 2011 it should be largely browser independent (unlike previous versions which were IE only)

3. The built in backup is image based... You can use Acronis if you want, but the SBS backup should work fine.

4. No realistic mailbox size limits.  2003 had issues with database sizes, but not so much in 2011.

5. Yes, you never want your user names and computer names to match. Change the PC name to ReceptionPC of something similar. And frankly, you should ALWAYS make individual user accounts - never use a shared login. You can create a reception mailbox and have the users access that.
0
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Btw, for flexibility and the ability to implement a bdr later if desired, order your SBS license through voljmr licensing.
0
 
OZSJAuthor Commented:
Thanks Leew.

3. Is this built in image backup also satisfactory for Exchange stores? If the Exchange database becomes corrupt (not sure if this is likely), can I roll back to an earlier exchange backup (without having to restore the whole drive image)?

5. Can I ask for more information about why the individual user accounts are important? They will all access the same server resources and email account.
a. Our reception staff have a very high frequency of rotation to other hotels... sometimes every six months  Are there any disadvantages to changing usernames so frequently?
b. Can multiple users access the same desktop on the Reception PC? Or will each have to have there own desktop, with outlook and signatures configured on each user account?

Finally, does SBS 2011 allow users to login and access their email from any desktop, or is it a bit more complicated than this? I am not entirely sure whether local user accounts are still required on the desktop, or whether this is all handled by SBS now.



0
Cloud Class® Course: SQL Server Core 2016

This course will introduce you to SQL Server Core 2016, as well as teach you about SSMS, data tools, installation, server configuration, using Management Studio, and writing and executing queries.

 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
> 3. Is this built in image backup also satisfactory for Exchange stores? If the Exchange database
> becomes corrupt (not sure if this is likely), can I roll back to an earlier exchange backup (without
> having to restore the whole drive image)?

The built in backup is designed to backup Exchange and fully restore exchange with the rest of the server if it fails.  The alternatives would be to use third party products - the only third party product I use is a Heroware BDR - but these are not cheap and they ARE full system backups that allow restoration of all services in the event of a fialure.

> 5. Can I ask for more information about why the individual user accounts are important? They will
> all access the same server resources and email account.
The bottom line is accountability.  NOT everything is tagged with a user name, but those that are can then be referenced as needed. To me, creating accounts is really not a problem and doesn't provide any real complication.  Using a generic account leaves room for abuse.  I also don't believe you (or anyone else) should know the passwords of any of the users other than your own password.  As the admin, you can change the password at will and this way, the user knows someone accessed their account.  Some security settings can be draconian and difficult especially for environments that don't typically need a lot of security, but user accounts and passwords - to me - are a measure that shouldn't be skipped.
> a. Our reception staff have a very high frequency of rotation to other hotels... sometimes every
> six months  Are there any disadvantages to changing usernames so frequently?
I've seen some weird issues with workstations and redirected folders when changing user names .  Given NEW user names is not a problem.  Hence, I avoid renaming users.  I would also be hesitant to DELETE users - instead, I would DISABLE the accounts.  Especially if you have staff that rotates to other venues.  If they come back, it's a simple matter of reactivating their account.

> b. Can multiple users access the same desktop on the Reception PC? Or will each have
> to have there own desktop, with outlook and signatures configured on each user account?
Kind of.  You can setup common desktop settings - shortcuts to programs, templates, etc.  With regards to signatures, you can copy existing signatures between profiles easy.  It would even be possible to script this (though specificalyl noting that the user should use the signature might need to be a manual action, but just once when they come on board.

Bottom line, if you had users switching out every 2-3 weeks, I would consider sharing a single login (especially if you didn't have in-house IT staff).  But if the turnover is 3-6 months or more (typically), I'd create their own accounts.
Finally, does SBS 2011 allow users to login and access their email from any desktop, or is it a bit more complicated than this? I am not entirely sure whether local user accounts are still required on the desktop, or whether this is all handled by SBS now.
0
 
OZSJAuthor Commented:
Thanks Lew. Great answers.
0
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Sorry, I missed the last question you had -

In a domain (SBS or otherwise) you get centralized account management - The only local account you should have is an administrator account that's only used in an emergency.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.