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Linksys WRT120N - Remote Management

Hello everyone,

I am going insane. I have configured a WRT120N at a remote location enabling Remote Management. The router is within a Private WAN and I am able to kinda see that the router is responding.

Ping 172.16.78.1
Pinging 172.16.78.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.246.78.2: TTL expired in transit.
Reply from 10.246.78.2: TTL expired in transit.
Reply from 10.246.78.2: TTL expired in transit.

Ping statistics for 172.16.78.1:
Packets: Sent = 3, Received = 3, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

The router is configured to allow both local and remote IP's but for the life of me I cannot Telnet or connect via IE. I searched here and the web and all I found was try 172.16.78.1:80 or 8080 or even 2022. I am stuck and I just cannot connect.

BTW the router was working perfectly 2 weeks ago when I was onsite but of course now I cannot connect and I am 2 hours away. The router is on a 172.16 network the remote server is using a 10.246 network. While I was onsite I configured the router with 172.16.78.1 which I am able to RDP into a local machine their (not directly connected to the WRT120N) and I still cannot configure the router. I get the same ping results no matter where I am. Tracert just points back to main GW (10.246.78.2).

Any ideas?
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Deacil
Asked:
Deacil
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3 Solutions
 
getzjdCommented:
Clarifying... you can RDP to a machine at the remote site and still cannot access the administrator interface?  Can you ping it from the machine on the local lan?  Have you had someone cycle the power on the unit?
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DeacilAuthor Commented:
Yes I can RDP to this location and cannot access the router.  I am guessing I can't because the PC I am on via RDP is on a 10.246.78.51 and the router is on 172.16.78.1.  The configuration was set for remote admin from 10.246.2.1 - 20 and I am physically on PC with an IP of 10.246.2.10.

Btw, the ping has the same results.
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getzjdCommented:
  So if you connect to a desktop / laptop also to the 172.16.78.x network at the remote site, you cannot ping it?
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DeacilAuthor Commented:
the router is in a locked cabinet and I am trying not to have anyone open it for security reasons (might have to though) so there is no way to directly connect to it but if someone connects through wifi i can manage it immedidately but the issue is they say they cannot connect to you through wifi.  

my major confusion is why i cannot connect when i have specified the ip's that can manage the device.  looking back i should have selected any and not specified the range.
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rogerhuntCommented:
I assume that there is another router that is providing internet access for the 10.246 network?

If you want to use it as an access point, disable DHCP, connect the LAN connection to the network, and don't use the WAN connection.  Configure the LAN interface with an IP on the 10.246 network.

If you want to use it as a router on the internal network, the outside IP address needs to be on the 10.246 network and you would connect to it using that IP address and tagging on port 8080 i.e. http://10.246.?.?:8080.

If the outside IP address was not configured, and you have DHCP enabled on the 10.246 network, locate the IP in the leases on the DHCP server and connect to remote management using that IP.

If the interface connected to the 10.246 network is currently set to 172.16.78.1, you can do the following to get in remotely to access it:

1. Remote into a machine on the 10.246 network.
2. Make sure the machine has a static IP.
3. Add a second IP to the NIC on the machine you are remoted into using an IP address on the 172.16.78 network i.e. 172.16.78.2.  Adding an additional IP to a NIC
4. Try connecting to the router.
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rogerhuntCommented:
I didn't notice that you had set an IP range for the remote administration from the outside interface.  One other thing to try would be to have someone connect a laptop to the wired network (10.246 network).  Remote into the laptop and on the laptop's wireless NIC, set a static IP using an IP from the 172.16 network and connect to the wireless to the router.  Then you can administer it using the 172.16.78.1 address on the inside interface.
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DeacilAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your input.  You are correct thier is another router (Adtran 1335) that the Linksys is connected to.  I needed them to be on seperate networks completely for security reasons which is why I went with the cheap wifi router.  It looks like that is my only alternative is to try the laptop hardwired to configure.  Once I connect I am going to try simply turning off the specific ip address for remote administration and make it ANY. I just wish this customer wouldn't have cut corners and simply upgrade the 1335 to include WiFi.  So much easlier.

Thank you
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DeacilAuthor Commented:
Solution was exactly what i already knew i had to do.  i was just trying to keep it simple without customer interaction.
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rogerhuntCommented:
One note about the separate networks (in case you haven't considered this).  Keep in mind that the router will route traffic on the LAN interface to the WAN interface.  Connecting the router to the existing internal LAN will still allow wireless users access the 10.246 LAN IP addresses.  You can test this by trying to ping a known good IP address on the 10.246 network.  It will reply and allow you to connect as if you were on that network.  In this situation you have a few options.  

A. This would be the ideal setup. - Setup a separate VLAN on the network and route the traffic out to the internet using an ACL to block it from accessing the 10.246 network.  Then connect the wireless router as an access point to this subnet.

B. Configure the outside interface of the wireless router with a static IP of 10.246.78.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.252.  This will trick the wireless router into thinking that access to the rest of the IP addresses on the 10.246 network are available via 10.246.78.2 and there will be no response from any 10.246 IP addresses except for 10.246.78.2 (unless there are other 10.246 IP blocks available via the Adtran).
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