Converting a Physical server to Virtual Server



 Are there any tools which can convert my current physical server to virtual machine ?


 Its all windows operating systems( 2003/2008/XP)

Any cons in the process. ?
OCUBEAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

alienvoiceCommented:
I used VMwares P2V for my conversion.

http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/

Below is a pretty decent how-to P2V using the vmware software.

http://www.petri.co.il/virtual_convert_physical_machines_to_virtual_machines_with_vmware_converter.htm
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
sushantspuroCommented:
VMware vCenter Converter can run on a wide variety of hardware, and supports most commonly used versions of the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems
0
OCUBEAuthor Commented:
Is there a full featured  trial version ?
0
Big Business Goals? Which KPIs Will Help You

The most successful MSPs rely on metrics – known as key performance indicators (KPIs) – for making informed decisions that help their businesses thrive, rather than just survive. This eBook provides an overview of the most important KPIs used by top MSPs.

alienvoiceCommented:
The VMware converter is free. No need for a trial version.
0
OCUBEAuthor Commented:


 Any hurdles which I need to be aware of when converting a physical to VM ?


 Lets say I have a physical PC (windows 2003) on a old hardware (OS on one disk and data on another disk- internally it may or may not be raided)

 Now the above physical server I wanted to use VMware converter and move it to another new hardware box as Virtual guest operating system.
0
OCUBEAuthor Commented:

 Continued........

  I mean in terms of underlying hardware does the virtual server should match the specs on Physical Server.
0
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
It's likely that the P2V conversion, because it cannot determine the difference between physical and hyperthreading, or cores, it will try and allocate a vCPU per discovered CPU. So often the converted VM could have 4 vCPU, and it will allocate 7808MB of memory, because that was available on the physical host.

Also as part of the conversion you have the choice, to change the disk sizes, I would recommend starting out with smaller virtual disk sizes, it's easy to expand, but more difficult to shrink.

In a virtual world, we can be more granular, and adjust vCPU, Memory, and Storage size to suit.

Again, start with 1 vCPU, and lower memory, and add more if required.
0
OCUBEAuthor Commented:

   How does people take care of this in a real world:

 Lets say we have old server with 2 xeon processors ( 2.6Ghz) with 4 GB memory.

 Now when we move to a VM box.

 How many cores cpu and memory you allocate on VM Host machine for this VM client machine ?  based on what the full Physical hardware specs ? or just being granular and give 2 cores and 4 GB first and increase the CPU cores slowly ?
0
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Personally, I would start with 1 vCPU, increase to 2 vCPU if required, and if applications, e.g. Exchange or SQL can use two CPUs.

Do you know the performance metrics of this physical machine, does it make use fully of 2 CPUs?

I would allocate 4GB of memory, and over time, I would look at the Active Metric in vSphere, and maybe reduce after a few months of observation. But that really depends on total host memory you have available, if you have lots to spare, you could always leave at 4GB for ever!
0
alienvoiceCommented:
Agreeing with Hanccocka on, (following up on my previous post). In our real world P2V of our enviroment, we P2V'd all our machines, reduce them to 1 CPU and added the same amount of RAM the physical machine had. Over time, we increased diskspace, CPU's as required.
0
OCUBEAuthor Commented:
Thanks
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Virtualization

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.