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Converting a Physical server to Virtual Server



 Are there any tools which can convert my current physical server to virtual machine ?


 Its all windows operating systems( 2003/2008/XP)

Any cons in the process. ?
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OCUBE
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OCUBE
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3 Solutions
 
alienvoiceCommented:
I used VMwares P2V for my conversion.

http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/

Below is a pretty decent how-to P2V using the vmware software.

http://www.petri.co.il/virtual_convert_physical_machines_to_virtual_machines_with_vmware_converter.htm
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sushantspuroCommented:
VMware vCenter Converter can run on a wide variety of hardware, and supports most commonly used versions of the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems
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OCUBEAuthor Commented:
Is there a full featured  trial version ?
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alienvoiceCommented:
The VMware converter is free. No need for a trial version.
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OCUBEAuthor Commented:


 Any hurdles which I need to be aware of when converting a physical to VM ?


 Lets say I have a physical PC (windows 2003) on a old hardware (OS on one disk and data on another disk- internally it may or may not be raided)

 Now the above physical server I wanted to use VMware converter and move it to another new hardware box as Virtual guest operating system.
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OCUBEAuthor Commented:

 Continued........

  I mean in terms of underlying hardware does the virtual server should match the specs on Physical Server.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
It's likely that the P2V conversion, because it cannot determine the difference between physical and hyperthreading, or cores, it will try and allocate a vCPU per discovered CPU. So often the converted VM could have 4 vCPU, and it will allocate 7808MB of memory, because that was available on the physical host.

Also as part of the conversion you have the choice, to change the disk sizes, I would recommend starting out with smaller virtual disk sizes, it's easy to expand, but more difficult to shrink.

In a virtual world, we can be more granular, and adjust vCPU, Memory, and Storage size to suit.

Again, start with 1 vCPU, and lower memory, and add more if required.
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OCUBEAuthor Commented:

   How does people take care of this in a real world:

 Lets say we have old server with 2 xeon processors ( 2.6Ghz) with 4 GB memory.

 Now when we move to a VM box.

 How many cores cpu and memory you allocate on VM Host machine for this VM client machine ?  based on what the full Physical hardware specs ? or just being granular and give 2 cores and 4 GB first and increase the CPU cores slowly ?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Personally, I would start with 1 vCPU, increase to 2 vCPU if required, and if applications, e.g. Exchange or SQL can use two CPUs.

Do you know the performance metrics of this physical machine, does it make use fully of 2 CPUs?

I would allocate 4GB of memory, and over time, I would look at the Active Metric in vSphere, and maybe reduce after a few months of observation. But that really depends on total host memory you have available, if you have lots to spare, you could always leave at 4GB for ever!
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alienvoiceCommented:
Agreeing with Hanccocka on, (following up on my previous post). In our real world P2V of our enviroment, we P2V'd all our machines, reduce them to 1 CPU and added the same amount of RAM the physical machine had. Over time, we increased diskspace, CPU's as required.
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OCUBEAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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