Backup Exec or Veeam???????

I am looking to backup 10 guest clients within VM (ESX) and 1 standalone Microsoft Exchange server that is a tower.  I did a demo on Veeam software and it looked good.   I know that Backup Exec is probably the most popular backup software so I am reaching out to the experts wondering  which route I should go.  I know that Veeam only backs up VM so it would be useless on my exchange server but maybe it is so much better than Backup Exec that it would be worth it.

Also what Operating systems does Backup Exec load on?  If I purchase it would it backup all of my VM’s and Exchange or is that additional licenses?

Thanks for taking time to read and respond to my post!!!!!
HBMIAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Backup Exec was a popular product to backup physical computers. But Veeam Backup and Replication is the world leader in Backup for Virtual Platform. I think you'll find most VMware Admistrators use Veeam Backup and Replication.

Backup Exec, requires a Windows OS, and you'll need an Exchange Agent to backup Exchange also.

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coolsport00Commented:
With file-level restore in Veeam B&R, not sure you need Backup Exec, EXCEPT for any other servers in your infrastructure that are physical, or for VMs that you don't use Veeam B&R to backup with. Otherwise, Veeam is really the way you should go. At about $500 per CPU socket (in ESX/i hosts), for the feature-set, it is a pretty cost-effective solution.

So, to summarize -> decide what data you need to backup and if it is only virtual or includes some physical boxes. From there, determine your budget for this project, and then further decide on your final solution. It may be 1 or the other, or a combination of both.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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HBMIAuthor Commented:
What are the hardware requirements for a veeam server?    I got a quote from a vendor for an IBM server and it was around $6,000.  Seemed like a lot for just Veeam.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Veeam is approx $500 per processor.

You can use a virtual server for Veeam Backup and Replication, the requirements are quite moderate.
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coolsport00Commented:
Veeam is software. You can install it in a VM. Let me recall (not at office at the moment), but I believe 2 vCPUs and 4GB RAM (can run on 1 vCPU and 2GB RAM, but obviously better to have a bit more resources). Veeam cost is the same as vSphere. It 'sees' CPU sockets per ESX/ESXi host you have VMs on your wanna backup.

~coolsport00
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coolsport00Commented:
Let me clarify my last 2 sentences there - Veeam doesn't cost the same as vSphere, but cost MODEL is the same, in that it looks at host CPU sockets. The cost is about $500US per socket as already mentioned. So, for example, if you have 2 hosts with which not only to back up VMs from, but "to", and each host has dual socket, dual-core, you need a 4-socket license (not 4-socket x 2 for dual core), or $2000 total cost for Veeam.

hope that helps...
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
It would seem your "friendly" vendor, wants to sell you a server for it also!
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coolsport00Commented:
Ha...plus commission! :)
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HBMIAuthor Commented:
You guys have given me some great information and I appreciate it.  One last question.  Is SAN storage the most popular way to go for storing these backups?  If so what are some of the units that people are using.  I would like to not spend a fortune.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
SAN storage is expensive, NAS based NFS, iSCSI can be used, as long as fault tolerent disks are used. Depends on storage needs, HP, iomega, Synology, Thescus, Dell, Western Digital, Netgear, all vendors which offer inexpensive devices, and Drobo.
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coolsport00Commented:
Well, that's a loaded questioin @HBMI :) If you were to use a physical box that Veeam is installed on, or a version of ESX/i that can have a USB-attached device to the VM that Veeam is (or could be) installed on, you can use that for backup storage. What you need to keep in mind though is availability in case you DO need to recover a VM. My org uses EMC SAN. FC. And that is quite expensive. And, I use part of it as datastore storage for my backups. Starwind, for example, provides a software-based iSCSI option for redundant SAN storage you can look into. And, my buddy up there, Mr. @hanccocka made some quickie vids on how to install/config Starwind, then configure your host to see that storage as a datastore (and thus, storage for Veeam backups). So, as you see, you have options...and options that aren't too expensive.

~coolsport00
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coolsport00Commented:
My last lil piece of advice to your last question is, do just a bit of reading, testing, and cost-comparison and see what is best for your org and within budget.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
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