DNS Issue with Website?

We used to have a website hosted with Hostgator.  We had a new website developed and is being hosted with a new hosting provider.  For some reason we cant see our new website internally. We can see it only from computers that are not on our network.  We can see it from home, a clients office but not from our network.  Our old hosting provider still hosts our MX records.
The only way we can see our new website is if we use a website like Proxify or some proxy site.

What can we do in order to view our new website internally?
maximus7569Asked:
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rogerhuntCommented:
Check your internal DNS server and see if there are any zones with the same domain name as the website.  If there are, update the www record in the zone with the website's new IP address.
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shahzoorCommented:
i agree with rogerhunt
further add exceptions to the proxy if you have and in Internet Explorer
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schapsCommented:
I would even further add the following:
This situation occurs very often when a company uses the same domain for internal network as they use for web/email (i.e. company.com). For example, if you have an Active Directory network managing your internal DNS, your Domain Controller will have one or more static entries to make sure your internal users can get to the website, but then it is often forgotten when there are job changes, etc., or else an 'internal' network admin is not notified when an external service IP changes. Anyway, since all computers on your network are given the DC's IP address(es) to use for DNS, the DC continues to give out the wrong IP for the website when it is queried.

If you're not using the same domain name internally as externally, then the network admin may have added a zone for the website's domain to try to optimize the Internet connection, assuming that a lot of computers on your network would be requesting that domain's IP address hundreds of times per minute. It's really not very useful to do that, as DNS queries to external DNS servers (your ISP, OpenDNS, or Google DNS, to name a few) take next to no bandwidth and are very quick, so that won't likely make any noticeable improvement in web surfing speed. And, when web services inevitably change an IP address, it causes problems like this.

Good luck.
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