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what is line rate and what means non-blocking regarding switches

hi,

can you guys please tell me what the line rate is and what "non-blocking" means.

thanks.
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traveller82
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traveller82
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3 Solutions
 
APoPhySptCommented:
Hi, your question was not very specific bot is this the answer you were looking for:

Line Rate:
The data transmission speed of a communications line or network.

or

It indicates the actual speed with which the bits are sent onto the wire (and is thus also known as physical layer gross bit rate). The data transfer rate (commonly known as bit rate) is the transfer rate offered by the physical layer to the data link layer. If you want to be precise, you should call it physical layer net bit rate.


Non-Blocking:
Use a non-blocking (asynchronous) socket, which allows your application to respond to events. For example, when the remote system writes data to the socket, a Read event is generated for the control. Your application can respond by reading the data from the socket, and perhaps send some data back, depending on the context of the data received.
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ArneLoviusCommented:
line rate non blocking would usually be interpreted that every port could talk to every other port at the speed of the port without there being a bottleneck on the switch backplane.
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traveller82Author Commented:
if i would have a 24gbit switch, would then be the line rate 24gbit? the line rate is associated with the actuall speed of the interface, right?
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Line-Rate and Non-blocking are terms used in ethernet switching. As Arne says, it means the backplane is able to carry all the traffic of all ports. i.e. A switch with 24 ports of 100mb which has a backplane of 4.8gb would be a non-blocking switch capable of line-rate operations.
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ArneLoviusCommented:
a 24 port gb switch would need to have a single backplane with a capacity of at least 24gb to be non blocking

as an example, you could have a 24 port gb switch that was made up of four eight port ASICs that only had a 4GB backplane, this would not be a non blocking switch

non blocking means that every device can fully utilise its link to the switch to communicate to any other port on the switch at the same time.

this isn't usually a requirement in switches for small offices where you have one or two servers and the rest are desktops/printers etc, but when you move to having server to server traffic for data warehousing/backups/replication etc then it can become significant.
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traveller82Author Commented:
thanks guys for your help.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
a 24 port gb switch would need to have a single backplane with a capacity of at least 24gb to be non blocking

Actually, it would need a 48gb backplane to be non-blocking (assuming that the ports could be full duplex).
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