Apply rules to copied pst

Hello, new year, new pst, so this is what I did:

1. Copied pst file named "2011_2.pst"  to "2012_1.pst" (file 2011_2.pst was named in outlook as "actual")
2. opened outlook and renamed the folder "actual" to "2011_2"
3. added 2012_1.pst and renamed the newly appeared folder to "actual"
4. Deleted all items excluding folders from "actual"

Adding a pst this way preserves the directory structure in this folder. But the rules I made still apply to the folder "2011_2". How do I apply the rules to the new folder (manual assignment is not an option)? I tried to add "2012_1.pst" as "2011_2" and "2011_2.pst" as "actual". That worked, but I'm looking for a solution that's more transparent (because I won't remember next year)

Thank you




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Stephan_SchrandtAsked:
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Chris BRetiredCommented:
Should not rename the current pst. It always stays the same; you name the copy something appropriate like 2011. You will need to recreate the rules.

Chris B
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apache09Commented:
Unfortunatley this will be a manual process.
The rules need to be recreated because the actaul pst has changed.

Rules assginements really have nothing to do with the Name you assign a PST in Outlook as much as they do the physical name of the PST File.

For example.
You can have psts called.
2011_1.pst
2011_2.pst
2011_3.pst
ect
ect

In Outlook you can add all these PSTs and Even Name these all as "Actual"

Now any of the rules that were applied to a Folder in "Actual" (2011_2.pst)
are applied to this specific PST as you would have had originally specified in the rule when it was created.

Once this file is removed from Outlook, or once the physical name of the pst file is changed
The rule will break

If you add another PST to Outlook, As the Name is only for your Identification Purposes, even if it has all the same folders.
The rules will not be applied to this new PST

In the end, you need to recreate the Rule

Or go back into the Rule
Edit it, and re-specify the email to be moved into folders in the New PST

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Stephan_SchrandtAuthor Commented:
I'm not willing to give up by now. Please also refer to http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Office_Productivity/Groupware/Outlook/Q_27521080.html. Thank you
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Karen FalandaysTraining SpecialistCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

The question has either no comments or not enough useful information to be called an "answer".
0
apache09Commented:
Do have to object,

Although the answer is not what the user may want to hear, it is the correct answer

Any rules appleid to a particluar PST have to be reapplied should they change to a different PST

This is very much a manual process in Outlook

There is no built in auytomatied way to re-apply rules created in outlook to a different PST or a copy of an current pst
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