pls explain charmap and symbols

pls explain charmap and symbols

I have found a symbol via run,charmap eg sign for not equal to  as "U + 2260"  How do I mimic this on a keyboard to get this symbol?
( a  complication is that I am using an apple keyboard on a windows machine)

thfc9wigan1Asked:
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Steven CarnahanNetwork ManagerCommented:
Maybe this will help:   http://www.nouilles.info/keyboard_shortcuts.html 

It shows the keystrokes for both Apple and Windows

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Raymond PengSystems EngineerCommented:
According to Wikipedia:

Character Map is a utility included with Microsoft Windows operating systems and is used to view the characters in any installed font, to check what keyboard input (Alt code) is used to enter those characters, and to copy characters to the clipboard in lieu of typing them. The tool is usually useful for entering special characters. It an be opened via the command line or Run Command dialog using the 'charmap' command.

In layman's term - it helps one type special characters which you normally would be unable to input.  Holding down the alt key + typing the numbers will create the character.
Steven CarnahanNetwork ManagerCommented:
Actually, I read the question again and you are asking about using Unicode (U+) which is different that useing ASCII.  Here is a good site on Unicode:  http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/rts/xaira/Doc/refman.xml.ID=X20

and look at www.unicode.org for specific information.
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thfc9wigan1Author Commented:
pony10us :  I only quoted the unicode reference as that was provided by Charmap.  My 2 options are either to be able to apply those unicode references (can't see/understand how to do that) or to find a ascii code eg alt +0247 gives the division sign.  When I estblish which is easier/more powerful, then I will apply that in my usage.

l33tfob : how do you get to the alt code ?  it seems to be giving the unicode code

Steven CarnahanNetwork ManagerCommented:
ASCII is simply a matter of using ALT + number sequence to get the character you want.  

Example:  ALT+147  ALT+168  ALT+147 results in:  ô¿ô  One of my favorites.  :)

The numbers need to be the ones on the number keypad. The top row numbers will not work.

Does that help at all?  You can find complete ASCII charts (including extended) either on the net or a lot of programming books. However probably the best source is:  http://www.asciitable.com/
thfc9wigan1Author Commented:
still uncertain as to how I would use u+2260 to generate a symbol
Steven CarnahanNetwork ManagerCommented:
Actually, I have been playing around with this.  I came across this site which really helped me:   http://www.georgehernandez.com/h/xComputers/CharacterSets/Shortcuts.asp

Excerpt that worked for me:

There is a fifth related method, but it does not actually use the numeric keypad:

HexadecimalUnicode, ALT+X Enter a Unicode value in hexadecimal (EG: Enter 00A5for U+00A5), then press ALT+X or ALT+SHIFT+CTRL+F12 to yield ¥. Note that this shortcut does not actually use the numeric keypad. Later versions of Word or Wordpad, or anything that uses a "Rich Edit Control". (FYI: Typing ALT+SHIFT+x converts the Unicode character preceding the insertion point to the corresponding Unicode hexadecimal value.)
EG: 100, ALT+X yields A in Wordpad but does nothing in Notepad.
Dr. International:
'This method should work in both Wordpad on Windows XP SP1 and Word 2002 and Word 2003, but it does not work in Notepad.'



Notice that it DOES NOT work in Notepad.
thfc9wigan1Author Commented:
Other pressure prevents me from dealing with this now
May repost in the future
Thanks for support and help this time
Sorry to drop out now
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