Multiple internet connections on one network

I have an office that is installing some management software which is cloud based.  The recommended bandwidth for 10 pc's is 2Mbs up and down.  The only broadband in the area is DSL with 4Mbs down and 768 up.  The upload speed is the issue.  I'm looking for a way to "combine" or split the two to get the required upload speeds.  It's not quite 2Mbs up if combined, but close enough.  We can get 2 DSL lines in the office.  I have 2 thoughts on how to get this to work.
1.  I was considering a router with a Load Balancing option (like the Cisco RV042), but from what I can tell, Load Balancing just shifts the bandwidth to which ever line works best.
2. Have 2 routers on the line (DHCP will be off) and have half the pc's configured with Router 1 as the default gateway and the other half on Router 2.

Any thoughts?
orthoscheduleAsked:
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ZShaverCommented:
proper load balancing will equalize traffic on both links if you have the limits set properly
for all intents and purposes for 10 users their traffic will be split among the links, reducing congestion which is probably why they recommended 2 up and down

a $50 router can do this, if loaded with DD-WRT
I have the WHR-HP-G300N  from buffalo which is actually a wireless router but I have it doing the same thing by converting port 4 on the router into a second WAN port using vlans which DD-WRT supports
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
You need a supplier that can bond multiple lines together. I am working with a client and supplier on just such a project. The lines (3) have been installed but not yet commissioned, so I cannot tell you the outcome. Our hope is about 3Mbit up and down to a branch location.  

The point I make is that bonding lines together for increased bandwidth is a Supplier project and not really a customer project. Look for a supplier in your area that claims to offer this ability and then meet with them.

.... Thinkpads_User
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ZShaverCommented:
what you are looking for is referred to as link aggregation
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ZShaverCommented:
you could possibly get a cheap router with DD-WRT and use load balancing to achieve this
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The company I am dealing with provides their own modem to pull the lines together. I should have mentioned that earlier. .... Thinkpads_User
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Here is the company we are working with.

http://www.radiant.net/

I am sure there are others as well. .... Thinkpads_User
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
For non ddwrt gear, I'd recommend a sonicwall, probably the tz210. If you don't get wifi or all the subscriptions it's only $500
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Cisco_CertifiedCommented:
Guys,

It sounds to me you are all talking about load balancing for outbound traffic, but did you forget about load balancing for inbound?  

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mohammadanwarPartnerCommented:
I think best for this scenario would be MultiLink Bundling; whereby you can combine 2 ports in to one bundle. These 2 ports will be taking inputs from 2 separate internet.

Refer below post:

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/networking/use-multilink-ppp-to-combine-multiple-circuits-into-a-single-circuit-with-a-single-router-interface/498
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Cisco_CertifiedCommented:
mohammadanwar, I believe someone already mentioned that...
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orthoscheduleAuthor Commented:
Like I mentioned, I have a Cisco/Linksys RV042 (or RV082) that has Dual WAN inputs.  Anyone have experience with one of those?
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
I agree with thinkpads_user.  For your requirements you probably need to be talking to the ISP.
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
Agreed. BEST is to have the isp bond the connections.
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orthoscheduleAuthor Commented:
ISP is ATT.  Don't think they do that.
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
Oh yeah they do.
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
They probably do.

Just as a comment, a 768kbps outgoing DSL connection is realistically about 600kbps.  You will be pretty far below 2mbps even if you get 2 circuits bonded.

Is "metropolitan ethernet" an option?  Multiple voice-grade copper pairs bonded together for broadband speed (with some fancy hardware on both ends; Actelis MetaLight for example).  It's expensive but works very well for us (20/20 in our case).  Avoid talking to the phone company proper except as a point of reference - They will have the highest prices.  Find a provider who can do the same thing and it will probably cost much less since they get the copper pairs at deep discount via obscure FCC rules and regulations promoting market competition.
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orthoscheduleAuthor Commented:
Just curious.  Why wouldn't the ISP suggest bonding when I expressed a need for more speed?
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
I suppose it could be the rep you spoke to doesn't know to offer that, or they may not have it.  The couple of times I've looked into bonding, I had to ask about it.  They didn't offer it up first, maybe because it's not all that commonly used by them.  Who knows.  Ask them and then you'll know for sure.  :)
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
If AT&T doesn't do channel bonding, don't be afraid to approach other providers.  Even if ATT owns the copper circuits, there should be other provider options.  FCC doesn't like monopolies in this business.  One thing that might keep you with ATT is if you're locked into a long-term contract that would carry a stiff penalty to get out of early if you switch providers.
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orthoscheduleAuthor Commented:
Looks like we're going to try load balancing.  T1 and bonding are too expensive.
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
Just keep in mind if you load balance over 2 links (as opposed to channel bonding), each user's "bandwidth experience" is equal to a single link's speed.
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
I should probably have said "each user's best bandwidth experience with a single connection" is equal to the speed of one of your links, and that's if they're not competing with anyone else.
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